#1
I'm a pretty experienced guitarist and I can shred pentatonics & natural major & minor all day, but recently I've been really into neo-classical stuff and I want to know where to get started if I want to be as well-versed in it as I am in blues, hard rock, and so on. I know all of the scales by heart, my legato phrasing is good, and my fretting hand is strong & quick, but I'm rubbish when it comes to things like sweep-picking, string-skipping, alternate-picking on multiple strings, and so on. So what's a good place to really dig into classical shred and learn it the right way?
#3
For one, I'd start listening to more Neo-Classical guys, and learn some of the licks the guys use. Also, you should learn how to sweep pick. If you want to be immerse yourself, start listening to Classical music and learn how to play specific songs on guitars. I'm on my way with Vivaldi's Winter. If it's too fast for you, get VLC Mediaplayer and use it slow down the song.
#4
like the one guy said listen to lots of neo classical obviously yngwie malmsteen would be good but jason becker, tony malcapine, rusty cooley, jeff loomis, guthrie govan ( not really neoclassical but fusion), those are some good starts. then start slow, with a metrenome.
#5
Well I already listen to quite a lot of Yngwie, Hizaki, Paul Gilbert, & Andy James (and Guthrie is one of my favorite guitarists - I should've mentioned I play a fair amount of both jazz & fusion).
#6
Quote by ARom22
Well I already listen to quite a lot of Yngwie, Hizaki, Paul Gilbert, & Andy James (and Guthrie is one of my favorite guitarists - I should've mentioned I play a fair amount of both jazz & fusion).


Start learning some Loomis. The intro to Miles of Machines is a ballbuster. If you learn it slow, it's possible that you'll also learn Sweep Picking and String Skipping.
#7
Try and learn jazz fusion. I know its not neoclassical, but it's great for getting your economic picking good and many other techniques.
Just Listen to Al Di Meola, he pretty much invented shredding.

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#8
Quote by art671
Try and learn jazz fusion. I know its not neoclassical, but it's great for getting your economic picking good and many other techniques.
Just Listen to Al Di Meola, he pretty much invented shredding.


Jazz Fusion is no better for practicing technique than any other genre that you decide to push yourself in, it certainly won't help any more on its own than just playing a few Malmsteen songs would.

I also disagree with your claim that Di Meola "invented" shredding: both Allan Holdsworth and John McLaughlin were shredding publicly before Di Meola's first release. Quite aside from which, shredding is just playing fast and plenty of classical pieces have fast passages, to claim that any one person invented shredding is ridiculous.


TS: Listening is a good start, try transcribing some pieces by ear, if you're a good fusion player it should be easy enough to do; if you can't get the sound of them by ear then get hold of a few tabs and try to understand what they're doing. That is the most important part of the whole thing, understanding what they're doing in terms of theory and sound.
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#12
Quote by ARom22
Well I already listen to quite a lot of Yngwie, Hizaki, Paul Gilbert, & Andy James (and Guthrie is one of my favorite guitarists - I should've mentioned I play a fair amount of both jazz & fusion).

Props for mentioning Hizaki

My advice would be to actually listen to some classical/baroque period music.

Why try to emulate people emulating other people, when you can just emulate the originators from the very beginning?
#13
Quote by zincabopataurio
Props for mentioning Hizaki

My advice would be to actually listen to some classical/baroque period music.

Why try to emulate people emulating other people, when you can just emulate the originators from the very beginning?



Good point, and thanks! Hizaki is one of my favorite guitarists. Listening to him with Versailles & HGP is actually what got me into neo-classical in the first place