#2
Shirts always sell good. Other than that you can do hats or posters, but they really don't sell that great for smaller bands. CDs are also good merch to sell.
#4
i wouldn't necessarily say to sell, but buttons and individualized picks are fantastic for giving to people during/after shows.

wristbands can sell pretty well too if you want to invest in them
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


Quote by UseYourThumb
You win. I'm done here.
#5
cheap buttons/stickers are neat. cheap. cheap cheap.
cds are always good, and people seem more inclined to pay if you only ask for donations.
shirts, definitely, if you have more of a fan base.
#9
CD and shirts.

Unless you're a huge band and can get away with selling anything with your logo.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#10
Band merch is something that can easily be taken too far.

Look at it logically.
Taking a look at the merch site I've planned on using when the time calls for it (band currently has no singer and any "solo" merchandise would be pointless as I get no gigs and only have like 96 subscribers on youtube, so no market) has the average stuff a band gets excited about when they've had 3 gigs and a couple of people telling them they're good.
So, looking through that, the things you know you won't sell are:
Totebags, Postcards, Pocket Mirrors, Mugs, Lighters, Caps, Bottle Openers.

Look at those things, think, would you even buy those things if they had a famous band/artist's name/logo on them?
Probably not.

And with the fridge magnets and stickers you already have (I would have avoided fridge magnets to be honest), they're the sort of thing you want to give away, not sell.
Same with those button badges which are good.

Those sort of things (minus fridge magnets, unless they get stuck on a fridge at practice areas or venues you frequently go to) are best to be used as promotion.
You give a bunch of people who see you gig button badges, they'll pin them to bags and stuff, people are going to see them out and about, their friends may also inquire.
Stickers, people always stick free stickers over the place, people are then going to see that and go on to check you out. People who pay for stickers put them on things that aren't going to be seen as often.


I think in terms of selling merch, you should stick to t-shirts, if you know you can sell them.
In terms of other merch, the stuff that's been mentioned (the rubber-y wristbands, badges, stickers) are great to giveaway and make people remember you too.
#11
^ oh yeah well stickers are basically for promotion. I figured I might just get some and give away during gigs cause throwing away a piece of paper (flyer or whatever) is quite likely unlike the sticker which is hard to throw away you know
it also bears facebook link and my website


as for the fridge magnets, I totally agree. It's more for either ars either stuff like that idk
#12
I know someone who makes average sized badges (1 inch, I think) for like 50 cent a badge. I wanna buy some from him, but I think that price is kind of steep! Does anybody else think that's too expensive? $50 for 100 badges?
#14
Quote by honkytown
I know someone who makes average sized badges (1 inch, I think) for like 50 cent a badge. I wanna buy some from him, but I think that price is kind of steep! Does anybody else think that's too expensive? $50 for 100 badges?


Good price, especially if they're pretty good quality.

That is the type of thing where you group merch together to make deals.

Buy a shirt, get a free badge. Buy a CD, get a free badge. And then price the badges at $2-3 individually. You'll most likely have a $4-6 profit margin on shirts and CDs; so if you can give them something extra for 50cents a piece out of pocket, to in turn help move the other merch, it's a good idea.

Honestly though you'll probably hardly, if ever, actually sell a badge if your not some huge touring act.
#15
Just ask yourself what merch you've bought of a local band. For me I've only bought albums and EPs.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#16
Buy a shirt, get a free badge. Buy a CD, get a free badge. And then price the badges at $2-3 individually. You'll most likely have a $4-6 profit margin on shirts and CDs; so if you can give them something extra for 50cents a piece out of pocket, to in turn help move the other merch, it's a good idea.

Honestly though you'll probably hardly, if ever, actually sell a badge if your not some huge touring act.


Yeah, I've found that giving badges away with CDs really does work - a 'free gift' seems to make people happy regardless of the fact that it's only worth 20p. We have sold a fair few, though - possibly they're more common over here?

You can't really sell stickers, IMO, unless you invest in the proper vinyl ones (and even then, there's probably not going to be too much interest). Again, they make great freebies. An album that comes with the CD/insert booklet/badge/free stickers definitely stands out from the crowd, and for very little additional investment over the straightforward CD/booklet option. They also give you the opportunity to do additional bits of artwork or political comment or variants on your logos, which I've always viewed as a sign of a more mature band - one that thinks about presentation (think of all the additional Tool artwork that's out there).