#1
(a noob question) when you record an instrument, how should you have the click track going along with it? Like if I am recording cello, do I put the click in headphones and then just play? What is the best way to do this?
#2
Quote by Sadbutrue62
(a noob question) when you record an instrument, how should you have the click track going along with it? Like if I am recording cello, do I put the click in headphones and then just play? What is the best way to do this?


Yes.

I like running the click from Reaper and running the computer output through the headphones. We use a y-cord so both of us hear the click--just 2 of us.

That helps synching multiple tracks for doubling guitars, vocals, overdubs etc.
#3
Yeah, put a click in the headphones to match the signature you're playing in. DAWs like Garageband have a metronome feature but other ones require you to make or insert your own click track.
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#4
Yeah, I was just going to stick some headphones in my metronome. I was just worried that I wouldn't be able to hear all the nuances of my instruments that were necessary if I had just a click going on.
#5
I make my click tracks with GP6 with the woodblock tone. High for the first beat per measure, low for the rest.
Then export to .wav, and import into Reaper

Much more versatile than the metronome and more reliable, too.
Last edited by jetwash69 at Dec 24, 2011,
#6
Quote by Sadbutrue62
Yeah, I was just going to stick some headphones in my metronome. I was just worried that I wouldn't be able to hear all the nuances of my instruments that were necessary if I had just a click going on.


U can do that too for simple stuff. Sometimes I like monitoring the recording through the mixer along with the click.
#7
Quote by jetwash69
I make my click tracks with GP6 with the woodblock tone. High for the first beat per measure, low for the rest.
Then export to .wav, and import into Reaper

Much more versatile than the metronome and more reliable, too.



you know that reaper lets you add clicktracks as well as use the metronome right?
#9
If you're using a portable recorder, you'll need a metronome with a headphone output or something similar to provide the click track for the musician.
#10
Quote by jetwash69
I make my click tracks with GP6 with the woodblock tone. High for the first beat per measure, low for the rest.
Then export to .wav, and import into Reaper

Much more versatile than the metronome and more reliable, too.

In what way? It's not like the Reaper one fluctuates or something.
#11
If you want to manipulate the audio and tie it into midi (to quantize, stretch, sync to synth drums etc - or export into some other program to do that - like sending a demo to a studio to have them produce a track) use the click track from reaper. That click track writes a midi timing reference that is layered on and gets saved with the audio in a project file. That's how most sequencers work. I use Sonar - Reaper should be similar. Your audio needs to be spot on (or close) to the beat for everything to work right.
Last edited by 667 at Dec 24, 2011,
#12
Just saying what I've done and what has worked for me. Always looking for new ideas and better ways of doing things.

GP6 click tracks are great for mutliple time signatures in the same song, mulitple tempo changes, and triplets/complex rhythms (I'm not a great player; only been playing 5 years, with no lessons, and not much time to devote to it, and I started old, so I need all the help I can get). Also I find it easier to use for learning songs since I usually do that with GP6...even the stuff I write myself. I'm still not ready to record my own songs because I need to get more comfortable at the tempos I want them at. Right now I'm about 10 - 15% slow, but that's better than the 50% I was at a few weeks ago before spending time w/GP6's speed looper.

My recording operation is pretty simple, so no sequencers (other than the computer). Just the computer, some mics/amps/pre-amps/digital drums, and a 12 channel USB mixer (all 12 thru the USB). Built a makeshift vocal booth in the basement, and plan to do my own mastering, no doubt learning the hard way and from other UGers. Good thing the genre is lo-fi garage rock
Last edited by jetwash69 at Dec 24, 2011,