#1
Hey everyone!

Here's my first video on when to actually apply a scale to music,
Rather the start with major i jumped straight into the harmonic minor scale!

It's spilt into two parts,

If you already know the theory and how to play the harmonic minor scale skip to part 2.
If you don't know the theory or how to play the scale watch part 1!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L5or14glgx8

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZR4R5F5J-dM

Have a very safe and merry christmas!

Pat
Gear:
O'donnell - Cocobolo fusion
Maton - EBG808
Ibanez Stratocaster (1976)
Chapman ML1

Reynolds JFR25
THD Bivalve

YouTube Channel:
www.youtube.com/patdavidmusic
#2
very good video. i would have more examples of chord shapes rather than strict theory talk
#3
The theory talk will enable you to find out chord shapes on your own, giving you all the inversions and voicings you'd like, instead of only knowing a few fixed shapes.
#4
I watched both of your videos, from a teaching standpoint.

There are some things, approach wise, that I disagreed with and found to be incomplete as a result.

For example, relating the Harmonic Minor to a Major scale, and not a Natural Minor. Harmonic Minor, sure has a series of reference points that are built from the Major, but the point is, that you are thinking "Minor", it's not a Major scale, why not reference and teach how it relates to the Natural Minor instead?

I say this because when you are in a minor key tonally, you have 3 possible scales these could refer to when drawing chords and triads from them - Natural, Harmonic and Melodic.

Practically speaking, the most common use of a Harmonic Minor is in a minor key when the V is major, and functioning as a Dominant. If you look at the chords/triads created from a Harmonic minor, for most uses the V is the most practical, and the augmented and diminished, are rarely used, although they could be, but its a little like handing someone a .50 Caliber and only showing them where the trigger is.

If you are having to teach someone how to use harmonic minor, its a fair bet they can't use diminished or augmented triads earlier, so I question the teaching order and application by encouraging a Min(Maj7) for "using" Harmonic Minor. Sure you can, but you should know what you are doing, and not merely painting by number. That merely creates the illusion of painting; it doesn't teach anything.

In real practical terms, Harmonic Minor usage is found where there is simply a Minor key where the V chord is used. That's the most common use and a place where you can really draw out the flavor and not have to have all these other ideas which create the illusion of teaching, but leave someone with a dubious set of skills.

Try it, go compose using your chords as taught, and post them up, and you'll see what I mean, use your Augmented and diminished's to your hearts' content, but then post up the results. I'd be interested in hearing a cohesive piece of music. This seems to be a case where a little knowledge that's right, can be a dangerous thing in the hands of someone who doesn't have much of a foundation.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Dec 25, 2011,
#5
Quote by Sean0913

Practically speaking, the most common use of a Harmonic Minor is in a minor key when the V is major, and functioning as a Dominant.

This needs to be emphasized 9001x more.


Really, there's no such thing as a natural minor, harmonic, or melodic minor. The context dictates what the scale degrees tend to do.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#6
So its considered hard to compose a melodic and meaningful piece of music using the diatonic chords in the harmonic minor scale? I always wondered how you are suppose to use the dim and aug chords in its chord family.
#7
Quote by Unreal T
So its considered hard to compose a melodic and meaningful piece of music using the diatonic chords in the harmonic minor scale? I always wondered how you are suppose to use the dim and aug chords in its chord family.

This video has a great overview of the chords in the harmonic minor scale and common ways they're used.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


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#8
I might just kind of agree with Xaioxi on this one, in that what we call "harmonic minor" and "melodic minor" don't originate as scales at all, but rather contextual chromatic alteration in a minor key.

People may often be inclined to think "Okay, I see a dominant V chord, so I'm 'switching to harmonic minor' at this part", but I don't think that's what's actually going on or is the best way to think of it. It's just following chord tones.

I also find the concept of composing a piece of music with "the harmonic minor scale" as an actual framework to be odd. I don't think it's impossible or anything, but it really seems to miss what its usage generally is. The raised 7th shouldn't necessarily be approached as a fixed scale degree so much as a coloration or a chromatic manuever relative to the harmony.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Dec 25, 2011,
#9
Quote by Sean0913

For example, relating the Harmonic Minor to a Major scale, and not a Natural Minor. Harmonic Minor, sure has a series of reference points that are built from the Major, but the point is, that you are thinking "Minor", it's not a Major scale, why not reference and teach how it relates to the Natural Minor instead?

I say this because when you are in a minor key tonally, you have 3 possible scales these could refer to when drawing chords and triads from them - Natural, Harmonic and Melodic.

In real practical terms, Harmonic Minor usage is found where there is simply a Minor key where the V chord is used. That's the most common use and a place where you can really draw out the flavor and not have to have all these other ideas which create the illusion of teaching, but leave someone with a dubious set of skills.



Hey sean,

Just answering a few quick points as it's christmas down here

Relating everything back to the major scale is just a method I'm using just to begin with for ease of use, it just seems to being easy to grasp to begin with.

Giving people the full knowledge and theory understanding is of course a must!
But until I finish my website with diagrams and text I'm just answering video requests as a previous thread stated,

Many people have asked for less or even no theory so I'm trying to do my best and open the door for a little to begin and build upon that in the future,

The idea for the video's was for in 10minutes to get someone to play a scale, understand the beginning theory behind it and then start applying it to triads and four note chords,

Of course there is more knowledge and theory to be had! As well as more short cuts and quick tips, there's always more!

I just wanted someone to be able to learn the scale and starting practicing right away, the diminished and augmented chords was an idea I had to shed some light on an idea that might have been over looked before,

I didn't want to go into keys just yet purely because i haven't made video's about them!
I'm waiting till I can use diagrams and more text on a website for that,

Just trying to explain a scale and the beginnings of how to use it, to people with little to no theory knowledge,

But your points are valid and from now on at the start of every video of this style I will state what we are looking at in regards to what else is possible, and more links with more info will be added!

I'm certainly not trying to teach a bunch of meaningless number patterns!

Thankyou for taking the time to write your response because it's comments like yours that are helping me improve

All the best,

And a very merry christmas,

Pat
Gear:
O'donnell - Cocobolo fusion
Maton - EBG808
Ibanez Stratocaster (1976)
Chapman ML1

Reynolds JFR25
THD Bivalve

YouTube Channel:
www.youtube.com/patdavidmusic
#11
Quote by Sean0913
Class act response, Pat. Big respect.

Thanks for clarifying your intent and explaining the mindset behind the videos. If those were your goals, I'd say you accomplished what you set out to do!

Merry Christmas to you as well! Good luck with your pursuits!

Best,

Sean


Thankyou very much for the kind words and support sean!
I think it's becoming very clear I should make short intro's in each video declaring what the intention is,

Hope you had a brilliant christmas!

Pat
Gear:
O'donnell - Cocobolo fusion
Maton - EBG808
Ibanez Stratocaster (1976)
Chapman ML1

Reynolds JFR25
THD Bivalve

YouTube Channel:
www.youtube.com/patdavidmusic
#12
That was probably the classiest response I've ever seen... As for the video, will watch in three days, after I'm laid off
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#13
Quote by vampirelazarus
That was probably the classiest response I've ever seen... As for the video, will watch in three days, after I'm laid off


That's very kind of you to say mate

Thankyou
Gear:
O'donnell - Cocobolo fusion
Maton - EBG808
Ibanez Stratocaster (1976)
Chapman ML1

Reynolds JFR25
THD Bivalve

YouTube Channel:
www.youtube.com/patdavidmusic