#1
Ok, so in champage supernova, Noel does an amazing job with the fills. In the beginning right before Liam begins singing the first verse, he does this country style lick which involves and forgive me ahead of time if I explain this very novice but it would look like this

E
B - - 5 - - 3- - - -
G -6 - -/4 - -/2 - -

So to me it seems like hes taking that "box" shape, of A major penta that starts on the 5th fret then sliding into the G major penta box then ending on an actual "A" note

why does that work? Considering that this song is in A Major and its minor is F#m. What am I missing here?
#2
just from the tab it looks like he's going to the minor third of the C# and B then hitting the root, which makes sense because c#m and bm are the iii and ii of A major.

don't think in boxes btw, it was hard to figure out what you were talking about
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Last edited by Hail at Dec 24, 2011,
#3
Quote by Hail
just from the tab it looks like he's going to the minor third of the C# and B then hitting the root, which makes sense because c#m and bm are the iii and ii of A major.

don't think in boxes btw, it was hard to figure out what you were talking about


If it makes it clearer, think of him doing the "D" shape but without the E string being involved so it'd be more of the Dsus2 shape, but starting at the C#, then the next shape starting at the B.

I can see those notes when I play the FULL C#m and Bm chords but why do they sound so country-esque and good coming from those two strings though? He's not the only one I've seen do this and he's also done it quite a bit.
Last edited by FlexEXP at Dec 24, 2011,
#4
Quote by FlexEXP
If it makes it clearer, think of him doing the "D" shape but without the E string being involved so it'd be more of the Dsus2 shape, but starting at the C#, then the next shape starting at the B.

I can see those notes when I play the FULL C#m and Bm chords but why do they sound so country-esque and good coming from those two strings though? He's not the only one I've seen do this and he's also done it quite a bit.


it's mostly in the twangy tone and the rhythm really

try sliding up to the f# on the b string and pluck the b open, then do that on the g and d. that's a common "country" lick.
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#5
Quote by Hail
it's mostly in the twangy tone and the rhythm really

try sliding up to the f# on the b string and pluck the b open, then do that on the g and d. that's a common "country" lick.


It's just crazy how it works so well without looking at box patterns. I'm still trying to interweave scales as a means to melody making. I'm at a point where I think I got all "box patterns" down.

So go to F# on b string, then pluck b open, then slide up to f# on g string and pluck "b" open again and repeat on d?
#6
Quote by FlexEXP
I'm at a point where I think I got all "box patterns" down.


awesome! now forget that shit.

or more accurately, don't focus so much on patterns but rather on scales.
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#7
Quote by AeolianWolf
awesome! now forget that shit.

or more accurately, don't focus so much on patterns but rather on scales.


How so? I mean in reference to the Pentatonics, I'm familiar with the notes in a scale but I thought I had it down with learning boxes. There's obviously something I'm missing. It's just knowing where to go to get this knowledge right now. I really want to polish this and make licks such as the ones mentioned above but not only make them but understand how/why they work
#8
Quote by FlexEXP
How so? I mean in reference to the Pentatonics, I'm familiar with the notes in a scale but I thought I had it down with learning boxes. There's obviously something I'm missing. It's just knowing where to go to get this knowledge right now. I really want to polish this and make licks such as the ones mentioned above but not only make them but understand how/why they work


there's a lot more to it than playing patterns. it's ideal to think in terms of notes instead.

but do keep all the patterns for finger exercises.
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Last edited by AeolianWolf at Dec 24, 2011,
#9
Quote by FlexEXP
I can see those notes when I play the FULL C#m and Bm chords but why do they sound so country-esque and good coming from those two strings though? He's not the only one I've seen do this and he's also done it quite a bit.

Diatonic 3rds. 6ths are also very common in country licks.

Diatonic 6ths in A. There's a passing tone(s).
-9-8-7-5
-------
-9-8-7-6
-
-
-
Last edited by mdc at Dec 24, 2011,
#10
Quote by FlexEXP
It's just crazy how it works so well without looking at box patterns. I'm still trying to interweave scales as a means to melody making. I'm at a point where I think I got all "box patterns" down.

So go to F# on b string, then pluck b open, then slide up to f# on g string and pluck "b" open again and repeat on d?


no, nevermind, lose it, let mdc deal with this, there's just what no stop
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#11
Quote by mdc
Diatonic 3rds. 6ths are also very common in country licks.

Diatonic 6ths in A. There's a passing tone(s).
-9-8-7-5
-------
-9-8-7-6
-
-
-


A guy awhile back was breaking down how intervals of 3rd and 6ths are common, i guess I need to have him explain this again. Thanks for all the input guys.
#12
Quote by FlexEXP
How so? I mean in reference to the Pentatonics, I'm familiar with the notes in a scale but I thought I had it down with learning boxes. There's obviously something I'm missing. It's just knowing where to go to get this knowledge right now. I really want to polish this and make licks such as the ones mentioned above but not only make them but understand how/why they work

In short, stop looking at your fretboard, stop thinking about dots, boxes and patterns and instead start thinking more about the sounds you want to hear.
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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#13
Quote by steven seagull
In short, stop looking at your fretboard, stop thinking about dots, boxes and patterns and instead start thinking more about the sounds you want to hear.

But you need the boxes and shapes to find the sounds first. After a while it will come down to musical intuition, but until then, boxes and shapes are good.
#17
Quote by mdc
But you need the boxes and shapes to find the sounds first. After a while it will come down to musical intuition, but until then, boxes and shapes are good.

No you don't, not really.

Anyone with the teeniest hint of a musical instinct can think up a simple melody to themselves. You don't even need an instrument to find sounds or create something, let alone boxes or shapes. I'll wager there isn't a rock fan alive who hasn't acapellad a face-melting solo whilst air guitaring. Musical instincts and experience preclude picking up an instrument, they're usually the reason why people pick up instruments in the first place.

You only need the boxes and shapes to find the sounds you've dreamed up on one particular family of musical instruments.
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#18
Quote by Sean0913
+1 Walk before you learn to run. Solid advice.

Best,

Sean

no.

What's wrong with learning the shapes? The majority on here play rock or metal. Not classical guitar. No offense.

Learning the notes is important, yes.
#19
Quote by mdc
What's wrong with learning the shapes? The majority on here play rock or metal. Not classical guitar. No offense.

Learning the notes is important, yes.

I think you've misunderstood.

I said he wasn't being sarcastic, which would mean that your advice of initially learning the shapes would be the equivalent of "walk before you run", which Sean said was good advice.

Ergo, he was agreeing with you.
#20
Quote by mdc
What's wrong with learning the shapes? The majority on here play rock or metal. Not classical guitar. No offense.


yeah, man. doesn't require much work to be a one-trick pony.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#22
I knew that comment may not have gone down well, but that's not what I'm saying guys.
#23
Quote by mdc
I knew that comment may not have gone down well, but that's not what I'm saying guys.

I still think you're completely misunderstanding what I was trying to tell you.
#24
Quote by :-D
Being primarily a rock or metal player doesn't immediately imply that someone is completely clueless.


i didn't say anything about being clueless. i said one-trick pony. if you're clueless, you don't even know that one trick. they have a clue. emphasis on the indefinite article.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#25
More specifically, I was referring to being clueless outside the rock or metal realm. People tend to have the preconceived notion that most rock/metal guitarists are idiots; I'm not saying that's not based in a certain degree of fact, as most guys certainly don't do themselves any favors. But the rock/metal/whatever group of guitarists tends to get way more shit than it should.
Last edited by :-D at Dec 27, 2011,
#26
Quote by :-D
But the rock/metal/whatever group of guitarists tends to get way more shit than it should.


yeah, i suppose that's a fair statement to make. i agree.
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