#1
How do you figure out the time signature of the song when you're presented the sheet music without a time signature.
For example I have an exercise that shows 3 half notes in one measure, The time signature could be 6/4 but the answer says it's 3/2. How do i know to use 3/2 when it easily could've been 6/4.
Last edited by Dewy141 at Dec 27, 2011,
#2
I'm pretty shitty when it comes to timings, but I believe 3/2 can also be 6/4 just depending on how many notes and beats you assign to a measure.
#3
it all comes down to context honestly, but most of the time these are just workbook kinda things meant to work on very small contexts. it's 3/2 if it's 2 halfnotes, it's 6/8 if it's 6 8th notes - if there are mixed timings, go to the most simple and logical one.

however, in a practical environment, it's whatever your conductor makes it out to be.
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


Quote by UseYourThumb
You win. I'm done here.
#4
Generally speaking, a 6/4 rhythm is felt in two (as in, ONE and a TWO and a) while 3/2 is felt in three (one and two and three and).
Money beats soul every time.

Money beats soul...every time.

Money...beats soul...every...goddamn...time.
#5
the numerator (3) gives the number of notes in a measure. the duration of each note is given by 1 over the denominator (1/2).

you can think about it like:

three half notes
3 * (1/2) = 3/2

other examples:

four quarter notes
4 * (1/4) = 4/4

thirteen sixteenth notes
13 * (1/16) = 13/16

3/2 is the same as 6/4, though.
#6
I know what a time signature is, Im asking if writing a 6/4 instead of a 3/2 is still correct.

3 half notes in one measure will work with either time signature.
Last edited by Dewy141 at Dec 24, 2011,
#8
Quote by Dewy141
How do you figure out the time signature of the song when you're presented the sheet music without a key signature.
For example I have an exercise that shows 3 half notes in one measure, The key signature could be 6/4 but the answer says it's 3/2. How do i know to use 3/2 when it easily could've been 6/4.


you're confusing me because you're bringing up time signatures and key signatures when key signatures are not even remotely relevant to this discussion.

Quote by gnomieowns
3/2 is the same as 6/4, though.




...oh. you're serious. sorry, no. see aeolianseventh's post for clarification. remember, it's not math. time signatures that are equivalent fractions are not necessarily the same. in fact, i can't even think of one case where they are.

the only other correct response in this thread is hail's. combine those two and you have everything you need to know. in short?

Quote by Dewy141
I know what a time signature is, Im asking if writing a 6/4 instead of a 3/2 is still correct.


no. because the feel will be different. 6/4 and 3/2 imply different beats.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#9
6/4 is what's called a compound meter. Basically, it's almost like a 2/4 in that there are 2 strong beats, but the ticks in between are triplets: ONE two three FOUR five six (think slow doo-wops)

But 3/2 is 3 strong half-note beats in a bar: ONE, TWO, THREE

So the basic beat of a 6/4 is a dotted half note (3 quarters), while 3/2 is a half note (2 quarters).


Quote by gnomieowns
*fail math*

3/2 is the same as 6/4, though.

NO.

...modes and scales are still useless.


Quote by PhoenixGRM
Hey guys could you spare a minute to Vote for my band. Go to the site Search our band Listana with CTRL+F for quick and vote Thank you .
Quote by sam b
Voted for Patron Çıldırdı.

Thanks
Quote by PhoenixGRM
But our Band is Listana
Last edited by Xiaoxi at Dec 24, 2011,
#10
Quote by gnomieowns
3/2 is the same as 6/4, though.

THIS JUST IN

COMMON TIME WILL NOW INDICATE 1/1 RATHER THAN 4/4, AS THEY ARE, IN FACT, THE EXACT SAME THING
#11
Quote by :-D
THIS JUST IN

COMMON TIME WILL NOW INDICATE 1/1 RATHER THAN 4/4, AS THEY ARE, IN FACT, THE EXACT SAME THING


...welp, a large portion of my musical knowledge is now obsolete.

just in time for christmas, too.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.