#1
The title is a typo, sorry. )

I was lent a guitar and the action is 300% of mine. The bridge thingy has two screw things without heads. When I used pliers to force the headless screws counter-clockwise, the screw potruded more from the body, but also potruded more above the bridge, so it's like nothing happened I think? (see left screw in pic, it's taller) Help me, it's so difficult to play.

Last edited by luxeion at Dec 24, 2011,
#3
What kind of guitar is that? Never seen a bridge that you can't adjust string length with, unless it's some sears guitar or something?
#4
Quote by Dimefan1993
What kind of guitar is that? Never seen a bridge that you can't adjust string length with, unless it's some sears guitar or something?
i don't know what it is. it looks like a strat with a fixed bridge. d brand says "encor"..or smthn.. :|
#5
Quote by luxeion
The title is a typo, sorry. )

I was lent a guitar and the action is 300% of mine. The bridge thingy has two screw things without heads. When I used pliers to force the headless screws counter-clockwise, the screw potruded more from the body, but also potruded more above the bridge, so it's like nothing happened I think? (see left screw in pic, it's taller) Help me, it's so difficult to play.




Wouldn't you twist the screw CLOCKWISE, to drive it further into the body therefore lowering the bridge and the action?
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#6
Quote by cccp2006
Wouldn't you twist the screw CLOCKWISE, to drive it further into the body therefore lowering the bridge and the action?
At first I did it clockwise. It drove the screw further, but also there was less of the screw above the bridge, that's why I initially thought I was doing it wrong. In the end I don't know.
#7
That's likely the worst-designed bridge structure I've ever seen, which leads me to believe that the previous owner (or A previous owner) has modified it... Poorly.
The two threaded rods sticking up look like sections of all-thread from a hardware store.
The sharp, rusty ends are going to be a hazard even if you get it adjusted.

If you want to tackle this yourself...Here's my plan:

1. Remove everything. Strings, bridge, etc.
2. make sure the bridge structure is at least capable of sliding up and down on the two vertical rods.
3. Clean the rust off the rods with a Dremel or a simple small wire brush.
4. find some regular nuts that will fit the threaded rods, and run them down to about where they will need to position the bridge, then place the bridge on top of those nuts. You'll use those nuts to adjust the height of the bridge.
Once you get it positioned correctly, you will then want to mark the rods and cut them off so they don't protrude.
5. Leave enough thread so that you can then screw a plated "acorn nut" on top for both looks and to protect your hand from the sharp edges.
As noted, there appears to be no string-length adjustment....