#1
Hello,

I've just started my next 'project' and I've decided to strip the finish on a limewood lp body. The finish is clear, showing the natural wood, I'm not sure if it is poly or nitro but it appears quite thin and has a glossy shine (i'm guessing poly).

I'm not sure if it is easy to tell from the pics but there's a cloudyness in some of the finish which has gone paler than the wood colour, would I be able to get right down to the wood using a heat gun and a thin chisel and some sanding?









you can see the pale area where the finish has filled in on the back of the guitar.

I also want to remove the binding, which is under the finish so I guess that will be the second job. I've already had a look at the binding, the glue doesn't appear too strong, some of it is already pulling away on the edge.

My aim is to, once i've removed the finish, tung oil it and dye-in subtly darker sides than the front and back.

Am I committing guitar finish sacrilege?

this is the first time i've refinished a guitar, any advice would be very much appreciated.

Thanks
Last edited by LovechildBolan at Dec 25, 2011,
#3
Sand off the Nitro, use something like 120-240 grit since its a light layer. Once you are done to the bare wood, you can use a hair dryer or heat gun and heat the binding up to losen the glue. Once it's heated properly you can use a razor or utility knife to get between the binding and body, but be careful not to hit the wood. It takes a bucketful of patience to remove binding without melting it.

Don't heat the bind for to long as it can deform the binding. Do it slowly. Then you have the binding to reuse.

Once everything is stripped, use 320 grit to lightly sand, then buy finer grit if possible to get it super smooth!

If you want to refinish with a stain read a lot of guides as wood will stain different with every square inch. Read up well and know all your signs of over staining and not enough.

If you decide to go with a solid color just lightly paint primer on a little at a time. I get the body as smooth as possible then I dust spray my primer on. That means a little bit at a time. You'll see little areas get covered slowly into a large area. Do this with atleast 50 coats of dust spraying. It sounds like a lot but it's not. It takes about 6 hours.

After you get roughly 50 coats on, wet sand with the finest grit you can. Get this as smooth as possible. Check the body for missed or uncovered spots. If needed spray more primer and repeat wet sanding.

After you get it wet sanded with Primer, add your solid color paint. Dust spray again and i typically do 100 coats of dust spraying. This builds a solid heavy layer of paint, but not ungodly thick, it's about the average Gibson paint job layer. Wet sand this again with the finest grit possible. It should be super smooth now. Check for missed or uncovered spots and respray if needed then wet sand again.

If you want, now if where you add decals or water slides, Checking the clear coat won't dissolve any decal you use!

Now you want to get a nice clear coat layer thats nice and fancy right? That's why you wet sanded before too get this good layer. Apply your clear coat with about 50-75 layers of dust spraying clear coat. Wet sand with the finest grit and apply another 10-30 layers of dust spraying to assure no spot is missed. Wet sand with the finest grit, check your smoothness and if you like it, you have just made a proffesional looking paint job!

Notes: You might want to tape off the binding channel till you are ready to clear coat. Then remove your tape and apply the binding and affirm in place with masking/painter's tape or rubber bands. I wouldn't wet sand the solid color paint coat until my binding is in place. After you apply your clear coats, your binding and paint will level everything out.

You should also tape off the neck pocket so you don't have issues later with fitting the neck. A lot of people don't but I do because then the paint won't build up and cause slight fitting issues.

You don't need to tape off cavities and in fact I wouldn't. The paint in there helps protect the wood from water vapor and dirt. It won't matter for the neck pocket being there is a tight fit there between the wood of the body and the neck.

Happy refinishing and painting!
Xter
Gibson Les Paul Custom (Aged White)
Custom Kramer Baretta
Custom Fender Strat
Epiphone Black Beauty
Epiphone AJ
Marshall JCM900 4201
Blackheart Little Giant
MXR Dist. +
MXR Six Band EQ
MXR Phase 90
#5
Quote by Explorerbuilder
50 and 100 coats is an ABSOLUTELY INSANE amount. WAY too many.
YOu only need as many primer coats as it takes to get it level and full coverage. For color coats, you only need a few medium coats.. then a few of clear.


No its not with DUST SPRAYING. You don't get a lot of paint on with dust spraying, but you can never get runs or drips. Please read more careful.

Thank You,
Xter
Gibson Les Paul Custom (Aged White)
Custom Kramer Baretta
Custom Fender Strat
Epiphone Black Beauty
Epiphone AJ
Marshall JCM900 4201
Blackheart Little Giant
MXR Dist. +
MXR Six Band EQ
MXR Phase 90
#7
^^ What the sane guy said +1. The guy wants to play the bloody thing before his 80th birthday for chrisakes.... 50 light coats will take forever and will look shithouse with sfa gloss off the gun. Only take 6 hrs... Id rather do 2 flash coats and 2 proper coats, a coat of clear and spend the next 6 hrs drinking beer than piss fart about blowing dust coat after dust coat after dust coat and get an inferior result.
Last edited by dazza027 at Dec 26, 2011,