#1
Hey im about to purchase an electro voice re20 and was wondering about its live characteristics. I know its a beast in the studio but how is it live for vocals?
#2
For vocals? I suppose it would do well. It's a dynamic and mine isolates sound very well, so you'd have minimal bleed. Whether you like the tone live though, is up to you. It might be a bit bass heavy, unless you plan on using the roll off switches. I'd probably just stick with a standard SM58 for live, it's not like the audience is going to be able to tell the difference.

FWIW though, I much prefer the RE-20 to the SM7b in the studio for vocals. At least for what I've used it for. Sounds great on kick drums as well
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#8
I wouldn't discount it for live use, but it certainly wouldn't be among my first choices.

A couple of reasons:
1. It is a large-diaphragm dynamic mic, which means it is very prone to proximity effect (that boosted low frequency that appears when you get up close to it). It is that proximity effect that makes it a ready choice for kick drums, bass cabs, and for radio announcers who want that "big radio announcer" voice. I can't help thinking that this would work against most singers in a live situation for singing with a band.
2. It is expensive. Expensive mics are much more likely to magically disappear when you trot them out to gigs.

My personal favourite for live vocals is the Sennheiser e835/845 e935/945 mics. They blow the Shure SM58's out of the water for basically the same price. There is a little bit of high frequency boost that helps the vocals cut through a live mix too.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
@axemanchris what if i just used the roll off switch to help take out the lows and did the same in the eq on the mixer?
#10
Hey, all you can do is try it out. It works for Thom Yorke. Every voice is different.

A good example is a recording situation I found myself in. Most people will tell you that an SM58 is fine for live vocals, but mostly sucks for recording vocals. I mostly agree with this (except I'm not a fan of it for live vocals that much either), and place it pretty much near the bottom of my list of mics to use for vocals when recording.

I had one singer who just sounded strident on everything I threw at her. My large diaphragm condensor - strident. My Sennheiser "live" vocal mic - strident. My large diaphragm dynamic mic (sort of like the RE-20 with the proximity effect... thinking, "well, that aught to cure it!") - strident. Getting desperate... a small diaphragm condensor - strident.

Last resort - SM58. PERFECT! GOLD! Never would have believed it, but for her it was fantastic.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
No prob.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#13
love it for vocals. So does Thom Yorke. My main use for it is on kick, but it's a superb mic for vox and bass guitar as well
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