#1
Don't really understand them. I think I heard somewhere that it is a combination of the two triads involved, but I can't be sure.
#3
the note on the right side of the slash ( the F# in a D/F#) has to be the lowest note. if you're playing with a bassist the bassist will play this making it less important for you to play it
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#5
Quote by lpcustom325
the note on the right side of the slash ( the F# in a D/F#) has to be the lowest note. if you're playing with a bassist the bassist will play this making it less important for you to play it


Alright. I get it.

So say I play a F dim chord (F, Ab, Cb). If I see an F dim/G, I would play the F dim on the D, G, and B strings and a G on the low E. Right?
#6
Quote by I AM DEREK
Alright. I get it.

So say I play a F dim chord (F, Ab, Cb). If I see an F dim/G, I would play the F dim on the D, G, and B strings and a G on the low E. Right?

Yes. But, not sure why you'd want a G in that chord. It'd be better labelled as a G7b9.

Did you see this chord somewhere? If so what's the context?
#8
Slash chords are those which indicate a different bass note. So D/C would mean a D major triad with a C in the bass (Which in this case would spell a D7 in 3rd inversion). Polychords, on the other hand, are those which indicate two different chords stacked on top of each other, notated with a straight bar line. So:

D
--
C7

Would indicate a D major triad atop a C7 chord, spelling a C13#11.
Ben
#9
Quote by mdc
Yes. But, not sure why you'd want a G in that chord. It'd be better labelled as a G7b9.

Did you see this chord somewhere? If so what's the context?


Nope. Just something I made up out of nowhere.