#1
I've this little doubt. Imagine a chord progression, for exemple A5, E5, C5, G5.
Now to create a solo on the lead guitar for that chord progression wich is been playing by the other guitar, I could ONLY use Am/A scale , or can also use E,C and G scales? I mean, all at the same time. Kinda like, the first part of the solo I play in the key of A then I change to E. Can I do that?
Also, I find pentatonic kinda boring is there anyother kind of scales that yo would recomend?
#2
no man you can't change keys, you're in the key of A. try the regular minor scale, over the E, play A harmonic minor
#3
The easiest way to tackle that progression would be to just play an A minor (NOT A major) scale over the whole thing. The place people tend to start when it comes to soloing over chords is to first analyze what notes are in each chord and then try to target those notes when you are playing over that chord. Even though you just have power chords listed, you could expand those chords to A minor, E minor, C major, and G major. For example, over the A minor chord you would want to emphasize the notes A, C, and E when playing over it. These notes sound the most "correct" when played over an A minor chord. Once you start getting used to how that sounds, you can then start emphasizing the other notes from the a minor scale. Also, don't be one of those twats who thinks that they are above using pentatonic scales. If it doesn't sound interesting over that progression, that's your fault, not the scales.
#4
Quote by MeteoraTortuga
I've this little doubt. Imagine a chord progression, for exemple A5, E5, C5, G5.
Now to create a solo on the lead guitar for that chord progression wich is been playing by the other guitar, I could ONLY use Am/A scale , or can also use E,C and G scales? I mean, all at the same time. Kinda like, the first part of the solo I play in the key of A then I change to E. Can I do that?
Also, I find pentatonic kinda boring is there anyother kind of scales that yo would recomend?


What the people said, that it's all in Am, is correct. Now what you are asking, is can you use the pitch equivalent of the names of the other scales, so let's see.

Minor Pentatonics have 1 b3 4 5 and b7

(If you examine this, it's almost entirely a Min7 arpeggio)

So lets look at the relationship of Em to an Am, as well as these other scales (The pitch equivalent of them - make absolute sure that you understand that, because though its the pitch equivalent of C minor Pent, for example - its in NO WAY functioning as a C Min Pentatonic in this context - its all FUNCTIONING as Am with some accidentals):

E min Pent: E G A B and D. All those notes are diatonic to Am. Not a single note clashes with A Natural minor

C min pent: C Eb F G and Bb. Eb might be used as a flavor note as would the Bb as a b2 which would be used as accidentals.

G min pent: G Bb C D and F. That Bb would be used as an accidental as well as it would function as a b2 over Am, and so you'd use it as an "off note" to add flavor.

None of these other notes, in principle would clash with the A Natural Minor scale. But it would be helpful to take these two "off notes" and strategically map them - hopefully you're fluent with your notes and letter names on the neck and are able to do this in real time, and if not, I encourage a study of this.

Also note that as the chords change in that progression, certain notes that sounded great over Am would tend to sound differently over other chords, so its important to be sonically aware of what you are playing. Using this or any other approach you always want to use your ears and develop a good pitch collection awareness.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Dec 27, 2011,
#6
Quote by MeteoraTortuga
I've this little doubt. Imagine a chord progression, for exemple A5, E5, C5, G5.
Now to create a solo on the lead guitar for that chord progression wich is been playing by the other guitar, I could ONLY use Am/A scale , or can also use E,C and G scales? I mean, all at the same time.


All at the same time? No.

Kinda like, the first part of the solo I play in the key of A then I change to E. Can I do that?


This happens reasonably often, although usually it happens because there's an underlying shift in the chord structure. It would require some artfulness to go from Am to Em without having the first F# you hit sound like a wrong note.

It an be done, definitely.


Also, I find pentatonic kinda boring is there anyother kind of scales that yo would recomend?

If you find the pentatonic scale boring, chances are good that you're thinking of it as a box shape rather than as a collection of sounds. Work of your ear so that you're playing the music you hear in your head rather than let your fingers make the decisions for you.

However, it's pretty common for most people to expand from the minor pentatonic to the full major and minor scales at some point, so you should probably add those next. Start with the major scale.