#1
I know the Pit is no doctor and all that, yadda yadda, etc, etc. I don't care, I just want some opinions.

I've spent Christmas with my grandma who is 87 now and she has been a little...odd.

She has no grasp of time. Even though she's got a clock in every room she'll think it's 4:00 pm when it's 8:00 pm, for example.

My aunt said that she found 700 euros in the trash which my grandma must have thrown out thinkining they were receits, bills, ads or whatever.

She tried to fit a candle in a much too big candle holder.

She cooked roast beef. Now, ain't nobody make such a mean roast beef like my grandma, praise Jesus for it, but this christmas it was well awful. It smelled like toilet and had been sitting outside the fridge for a day or two. I'm suprised I didn't get food poison.

She also owns a pub, and she asked my mom to order more alcohol for the pub because she heard that the "euro went down against the dollar" that day. Flashes from the inflation in post WWI Germany?

Do you guys think she's showing early signs of dementia or is she just being old?
#2
She's 87 man hate to break it to you but shit like that starts to happen and isn't going to get much better.
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#3
When I got to the end of your post I forgot what you wrote .. so I got you a man kicking a pregnant woman.

#4
I think Jackal has some first hand experience.
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#5
I hate to say it mate, but I think old age has caught your meemaw up.

That does sound like the onset of mental degradation, my grandmother went through the same recently and now she can't remember anything from the past 60 years. Not even what happened ten minutes ago.
#6
I think Dave Mustaine has it
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#7
My grandma has dementia and she's also 87 (fancy that).

Her 'theories' are crazy, like she thinks her son-in-law waits by the washing machine so he can feel her knickers when they come out. There are dozens a lot worse than this that I can't recall. But yeah, she has well and truly lost it.

Your grandma sounds quite mild really, compared to mine anyway.
#8
I have a degree in psychology and work with people suffering from cognitive conditions very often.

To answer your question; yes, these are definitely signs of either a degenerative condition, or a brain tumour. Obviously, given her advanced age, the former is more likely. This is definitely cause to see a neurologist. Depending on the type of degeneration that your grandmother is experiencing, there may be forms of medical help that can slow the process, but it's unlikely that she will make a full recovery. She may also benefit from counselling to learn of ways to manage her condition as it worsens.
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#10
someone should keep an eye on your grandmother.

a year ago mine was living in her own apartment, acting like a normal old person. then she started behaving weird, just like yours.


now she lives in a retirement home, only wants to be fed cake cut into little pieces and when she tries to put them in her mouth herself, they fall to the ground. then the next few minutes she just stares at it with this stupid grin on her face before taking another piece of cake, occasionally asking 'what is all this dirt on the floor?'

these things go fast
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#11
Dementia is terrible. It just wipes out a person (or at least, can).

My grandma had it, though I was too young at the time to have really known her when she was in working order, so to speak. It must've been terrible for my mum though, seeing her mother who raised her and a person she'd known her entire life just disappear.

It can come in different degrees though, you might get them just being forgetful or seeming a bit stupid, or having some crazy theories (like novacane's knicker touching thing, and still have their same personality and be able to look after themselves, or they can just fall apart into nothing. My grandma just became a shuffling mumbling zombie. She didn't recognise anyone and couldn't even string together a sentence. It's horrible really.
#12
It is Dementia.

My grandparents have it too.

Damn, can't even joke about it right now.
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#14
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I have a degree in psychology and work with people suffering from cognitive conditions very often.

To answer your question; yes, these are definitely signs of either a degenerative condition, or a brain tumour. Obviously, given her advanced age, the former is more likely. This is definitely cause to see a neurologist. Depending on the type of degeneration that your grandmother is experiencing, there may be forms of medical help that can slow the process, but it's unlikely that she will make a full recovery. She may also benefit from counselling to learn of ways to manage her condition as it worsens.


If I offered to get her help she'd get really offended. That's the type of person she is.

She had laser eye surgery 15 years ago, and 5 years ago my mom randomly asked her how her vision is and she said "I can't see any colour from the eye I was operated on". "Well why haven't you said that before?"
"Oh, well you never asked..."
That's the kind of person she is.

She still "works" and overlooks the pub that she's been running for over 60 years and she'll do it until she loses her mind I think. However, 5 years ago things have slowly gotten worse and worse and in the last 4 months things seem to have made a significant jump.

She had to fall three times on the streets until she gave in and decided to use a walking stick. Meaning, she'll never go to a retirement home unless someone forcibly carries her there.
#15
Sounds like it. A couple of my relatives have it and it's horrible.

^and yeah, all of them are like that as well. They still refuse everyone's help and it's been like 10-20 years.
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#16
Sucks I know, but my Grandma had Dementia before dying a couple of years ago, and those sound like the symptoms.
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#17
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If I offered to get her help she'd get really offended. That's the type of person she is.

She had laser eye surgery 15 years ago, and 5 years ago my mom randomly asked her how her vision is and she said "I can't see any colour from the eye I was operated on". "Well why haven't you said that before?"
"Oh, well you never asked..."
That's the kind of person she is.

She still "works" and overlooks the pub that she's been running for over 60 years and she'll do it until she loses her mind I think. However, 5 years ago things have slowly gotten worse and worse and in the last 4 months things seem to have made a significant jump.

She had to fall three times on the streets until she gave in and decided to use a walking stick. Meaning, she'll never go to a retirement home unless someone forcibly carries her there.

These conditions typically don't make significant sporadic jumps like that. They tend to be much more gradual, which is why we often don't even notice that it's happening until years after the initial onset. If anything, I'd say that it's more of a reason to see a doctor.

Is there any way that you could convince her to see a GP for a regular check-up, but mention these symptoms to that doctor so that he can recommend a visit to a neurologist?
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#18
Quote by instagata0
These conditions typically don't make significant sporadic jumps like that. They tend to be much more gradual, which is why we often don't even notice that it's happening until years after the initial onset. If anything, I'd say that it's more of a reason to see a doctor.

Is there any way that you could convince her to see a GP for a regular check-up, but mention these symptoms to that doctor so that he can recommend a visit to a neurologist?


Yeah, I'm just having that conversation with my mother to talk to her doctor (who, wonderfully, is also rather old and in my opinion should have retired over a decade ago).

She goes to the doctor every 2 to 3 weeks. I'm suprised nothing has been done before. Maybe the doctor doesn't notice anything, I don't know. She does try very hard to hide any weakness anyway, as older people do.

I also think she's got progressed glaucoma because she seems to have signs of tunnel vision, or possibly vision loss due short-term stroke or something.

Ah, bad times folks.
#19
Sorry to hear that, sounds terrible man. I've seen other people with Dementia and it's pretty heartbreaking, to be honest.
#20
I'm obviously not a doctor, but from my experiences, she's getting some form of dementia.

My grandmother died from it, well Alzheimer's, but my point remains. To be honest, by the end of it I was glad she died finally instead of having to go through another day of her complete unknowing of the world around her. She didn't know her son, her daughter, her husband, her grand children, her sister, all she did was sit in a chair and sing songs, with no real melody, just a bunch of random notes.

It's very sad to watch. At first we all thought it was kind of funny, because she was talking to the people working on her house, petting the stray cat and leaving milk out for it, when these things didn't really exist outside of her head.

Laughing is really the only thing that helped my family cope with her passing, because we all knew it was coming, and she didn't mind, as she had moments where she remembered completely random things, or they'll remember what they just said and laugh about it.

But ultimately, it was very saddening. My grandma lived for one year after my grandfather passed away, and from time to time, she thought he was a guy living in the auxiliary with her, then she thought he was alive somewhere else (Getting milk, food, whatever) or she remember he passed away and began crying.

It's going to be rough if she gets Alzheimer's, but just remember that you love her and won't forget her.
#21
My grandmother has dementia, we had to move her out of her apartment because she was feeling miserable, but guess what? She doesn't remember how miserable she was in her old apartment, and now in her new home, she only complains.
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#22
My great grandmother, who died only a year or two ago, had it. If she drives, watch out. My grandma was driving and totally forgot where she was, and drove on to a walking trail with people on it. My actually grandma (We referred to the great grandma as grandma) put her in a nursing home so her and her sister could check on her as much as they needed. We'd visit and she'd entirely forget who we were or what had happened. She was convinced a girlfriend of mine was family since she has some similar physical traits.

The weird thing was, she knew she was forgetting. If she was eating, she'd saying something was stuck to her teeth when she couldn't get a name out or said the wrong one. She realized something was wrong and tried to hide it. We tried to laugh it off most times but it's a pretty terrifying condition.
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#23
My grandmother (mid-late 80s, I don't remember her precise age, possibly 86) is also showing early signs of dementia. She lives in a retirement home now, and one day at lunch, someone at her table started talking about sex. She was so offended that she started screaming at the other woman, and now she refuses to eat lunch with the other people. She was at the "cool" table (yes, apparently senior citizens have cool tables), and she feels that denying the others her presence at lunch is a punishment for them. It's been eight months, and she still takes her meals in her room rather than the cafeteria.

She started slipping before we put her in a home. Moving her out was a very depressing thing. She kept protesting, even though everyone knew she could no longer take care of herself. She also forgets who my younger sister is at times. I feel for ya, TS.
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Last edited by Spartan070sarge at Dec 27, 2011,
#25
My nana had it...some weird shit happened there. Like she was marching in certain War ceremonies with her dead siblings and stuff.

She hardly moved.
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#27
Sorry man but yeah it sounds like dementia or perhaps Alzheimer, or both, as was the case of my grandfather.

The thing to look out for is the vacant stare, child like disposition at times, inexplicable anger, regressing to a routine from earlier in her life, confusing names of people with people in her past. And the time that it is most noticeable is when she has literally just woken up or when she is tired.

The best way to check without seeing a doctor is ask her to tell a story from her past and then ask her to tell you a story about something that happened a day or so ago. IF the second story is noticeable more confused, vague or lacking in detail etc then she may have Alzheimer/ dementia


You may want to raise the issue with your mother/father.
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#28
ah yes dementia , chickens can't actually fly you know? because they have no oil for the engine.

seriously though , It can be funny to watch in others but not something i plan on keeping if i get it.
Last edited by burghUK at Dec 27, 2011,
#29
My grandma had dementia pretty bad toward the end. She'd always wake up & be like "we gotta go to Church" & my aunt (who was living with her) would be like "lol, ma, it's 9pm on a Wednesday" and stuff like that. And like, she'd order a meal, eat it, and then be like "I'm hungry, can't wait for the food to get here."

She never had wacky flashbacks or forgot who people around her were or anything, but she had no sense of where & when she was. It was tragicomical.
#30
My grandma had Alzheimer's, she'd show up at our sometimes multiple times a day not remembering she had come before and say things like she hadn't seen us in forever. By then end of her life she couldn't remember who the people were that were taking care of her. Its tough stuff to deal with and it never gets better only worse. The only thing you can do is spend as much time with that person before the disease takes over their personality completely.
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