#1
So for a long time i have tried to remember the pich of a C. I listen to it and sing it, i even have a c note as my morning alarm lol. The problem is that i cant serm to remember this pich no matter how hard i try. I know alot of pepole that can remember several notes in their head perfectly all the time. How do i do it?? What are some good practicing methods? I hear pepole say that they just remember them. How is it possible?
#5
For me, it's come from just listening to and learning to play songs. I can pick out the E major scale and its constituent notes because I've memorised the entirety of DragonForce's 'Once in a Lifetime'. From there, it's just a matter of transposing my memory of that pitch down the appropriate number of octaves, and if I was wrong, I listen to both notes in my head to hear what interval it is to see how far off I was.

So I'd recommend being able to not only memorise a song, but the actual notes that are being played, too. With enough practise and simply listening, you'll familiarise yourself with it.
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#7
^What Keth said, I found when similarly trying to remember intervals between notes, having a well known song with that interval is a good reference point...

With just remembering a note, that can be a tad trickier as you're after something like perfect pitch. Right now I'm imagining a C note in my head, and it sounds right, but I won't know if it is until I play it on the guitar....

Are you trying to remember it for singing purposes? Would there be a certain feel to the note when you sing it?
#8
Very few people have the ability to remember a specific note.

It's not particularly reasonable to expect yourself to develop that ability. Some people have it. It is, fortunately, a very UNimportant skill for a musician. Most of the great musicians you know do not have perfect pitch, so don't worry about it.
#9
Well having perfect pitch is a good start haha

But really, just apply the pitch somehow I guess. Instead of just trying to memorize the pitch outright, associate it with something. For me, I've gone almost everyday having to tune to a 440A so I'm pretty good at getting that pitch. But for other pitches, if asked outright to sing it or identify a note, I have to think of the note relative to the A in my head. Relative pitch is a useful tool.
#10
Steve Vai´s routine helps a lot, specifically that bit about applyng vibrato to a single note untill you exhaust all possible ways of playing it.. (playing the same note for an hour, day after day) sounds demented but it would get you there..

+singing it.
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#11
and someone had to mention perfect pitch.... waiting for the pic... waiting... waiting...
#12
If you are trying for Perfect Pitch it can be done. There are people who have achieved it through different points in their playing or musical life, But remember. It can be a blessing and a curse.
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#13
Quote by Xter
If you are trying for Perfect Pitch it can be done. There are people who have achieved it through different points in their playing or musical life, But remember. It can be a blessing and a curse.

Why can it be a curse?
#14
Quote by Usernames sucks
Why can it be a curse?


Imagine that you had Perfect Pitch, that means slightly out of tune notes would be cringing to listen too.

Jason Becker has a friend named Dan who has Perfect Pitch, Jason said it's hard for Dan to appericate music fully if it isn't in tune excatly.
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#15
i'll just put it out there, it's almost impossible to achieve perfect pitch after you're around 10 years old - the learning curve increases exponentially with your development. it can be learned still, but it'll take far more effort than what you get out of it and really doesn't benefit you nearly as much as a strong sense of relative pitch. if you already have perfect pitch, it's great, but having to put in effort for it just isn't nearly as beneficial as the plethora of other things you can excel in.

don't waste 10 years of your time trying to get a useless skill.
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#16
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i'll just put it out there, it's almost impossible to achieve perfect pitch after you're around 10 years old - the learning curve increases exponentially with your development. it can be learned still, but it'll take far more effort than what you get out of it and really doesn't benefit you nearly as much as a strong sense of relative pitch. if you already have perfect pitch, it's great, but having to put in effort for it just isn't nearly as beneficial as the plethora of other things you can excel in.

don't waste 10 years of your time trying to get a useless skill.

Well, i never said that i want to develop perfect pitc, i just want to learn the note c. So for example if i hear a melody in e major, i can think a maj 3rd up from that c i know. I can then relate to that e note and find out the rest of the melody, before i even tutch the guitar. That would seem pretty usefull
#17
Quote by Usernames sucks
Well, i never said that i want to develop perfect pitc, i just want to learn the note c. So for example if i hear a melody in e major, i can think a maj 3rd up from that c i know. I can then relate to that e note and find out the rest of the melody, before i even tutch the guitar. That would seem pretty usefull


so you're trying to learn relative pitch
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#18
Quote by Usernames sucks
Well, i never said that i want to develop perfect pitc, i just want to learn the note c. So for example if i hear a melody in e major, i can think a maj 3rd up from that c i know. I can then relate to that e note and find out the rest of the melody, before i even tutch the guitar. That would seem pretty usefull


Developing relative pitch will get you 99% of this.

You hear a song, you understand it's structure relative to its tonic, and then you sit down at your guitar, figure out the tonic, and you have the whole song.

This is all standard ear training stuff. Memorizing C isn't part of it.
#19
Quote by Usernames sucks
Why can it be a curse?

I can tell you personally that it's really annoying when a professor plays a transposition example and has you notate it in a different key than what you're hearing just for the hell of it.

Bastards.
#20
The best way that I know how to do it is to learn to solfège. Essentially singing do, re, mi, etc. This will help your relative pitch amazingly as you'll be doing it without an instrument, just your voice. Get a piece of music, sing the notes using solfège and use something like a piano or synth with perfectly tuned notes to check your pitches. Practice this a lot.

Now, most of the time, you just have 'do' as the root note of the song. What you can do however is use a fixed 'do' is instead always treat 'do' as C. This gives you a sound that you sing for every single note on a scale. You practice this the same way I described above, just using the same sound for a note no matter what key it's in. This essentially gives you a mnemonic device for each note and helps with relative pitch as well.

That's the best, structured way that I know to learn how to identify specific notes and remember pitches if you don't already have perfect pitch.