#1
Hello,

I heard that exciters can give distorted guitars that wall of sound effect or something.

Anything else I should know about them?
#2
Basically they make a signal seem brighter and more intelligible which allows it to cut through a mix better. I wouldn't say it makes it seem like a wall of guitars but it will enhance them and bring out some clarity and definition to your tones.

A better way to go about getting a 'wall of sound' from guitars, is to simply double the riff, lick, etc. Nothing makes a 'wall of sound' better than multi-tracked guitars.

#3
I already double track my guitars and was wondering if this will improve them a bit when I'm doing metal/shreddy stuff

Thanks for the info man....I guess with a little bit of taste I could make the sound seem bigger.
#4
It all comes down to how you want to improve them. An Aural Exciter is going to bring out clarity and brighten whatever you use it on. So if that's what you're after it's obviously a good bet. If you're just trying to make them bigger you could do a number of things.

You could record more doubles. It's not strange to have 8 of the same guitar part in some cases.

Play with panning your doubles out in stereo. This will widen the image of the guitar, making it seem larger

You could also opt for a slight delay to thicken them. We're talking short delay with little feedback/regen aka don't have a lot of repeats.

You could also mix other elements in your mix to seem smaller, making your guitars seem larger by comparison. Most people simply try to push everything to be bigger when sometimes it is easier to subtract than it is to add. Remember, only one element to your mix can be biggest.

#6
Quote by Zeppelin Addict

You could also mix other elements in your mix to seem smaller, making your guitars seem larger by comparison. Most people simply try to push everything to be bigger when sometimes it is easier to subtract than it is to add. Remember, only one element to your mix can be biggest.



All good advice, but this point especially is SO overlooked. In a room full of giants, nobody seems especially tall. Take a room full of kindergarten kids and the 5'4" Kindergarten teacher seems quite tall. Listen to a lot of mixes that make you notice how huge the guitars are, and you will often find that the drums are, by comparison, quite small.

Quote by Zeppelin Addict

You could record more doubles. It's not strange to have 8 of the same guitar part in some cases.


One caution here, though.... you will get to a point where you are actually defeating your own purpose and working against yourself. Take that room full of giants. Keep throwing giants into the room. Now you've got so many giants that all you see are arms and legs and feet. At that point, it is hard to tell how big they are.

The punch of the guitars lives in the space around them. Too many layers of guitars means plugging up all of that space around them, making your guitar mix like the room full of giants. You don't see giants anymore. You see arms and legs and feet. Zoom the camera out a bit, get rid of some giants, and then you see a couple of giants in a room full of regular-sized people and regular-sized furniture, and the giants actually seem a lot bigger again.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
To be honest, it's a solution to a problem that shouldn't really exist in the first place.

Mic up your guitars well, mix properly, and you shouldn't need any kind of gimmicky plugin. Exciters have their uses, but a 'wall of sound' is pretty much just multiple tracks of well-recorded, well-performed guitar.

When I'm doing 'wall of sound' mixes I generally use two tracks had panned left and right (same guitarist playing the same part twice), and another two tracks (using different guitar part/tone/amp etc) at about 50-80% left and right.