#1
So my band hired a manager about 3 months ago and we've seen little to almost no progress... The only thing we asked him to do was to take care of business with promoters and booking agents.
After being specificaly asked to be booked on a show i sent that person in the direction of our manager. I later receive a message from our manager the he isn't going to deal with that part of the business...
Is that not what a manager does?? What exactly is the duties of a manger?? And while on the topic, the jobs of a Publicist, Booking agent, etc..??
#2
if the manager isn't gonna do it, he sure as hell better have a booking agent that will do it on his dime
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#3
Quote by Mr. Ursee
So my band hired a manager about 3 months ago and we've seen little to almost no progress... The only thing we asked him to do was to take care of business with promoters and booking agents.
After being specificaly asked to be booked on a show i sent that person in the direction of our manager. I later receive a message from our manager the he isn't going to deal with that part of the business...
Is that not what a manager does?? What exactly is the duties of a manger?? And while on the topic, the jobs of a Publicist, Booking agent, etc..??



He should do that. Ask him what he thinks his job description is and what he expects of you and then visa versa. If he's not willing to help you, lose him. Managers are like guitarists. There's millions of them.
#4
Quote by Mr. Ursee
So my band hired a manager about 3 months ago and we've seen little to almost no progress... The only thing we asked him to do was to take care of business with promoters and booking agents.
After being specificaly asked to be booked on a show i sent that person in the direction of our manager. I later receive a message from our manager the he isn't going to deal with that part of the business...
Is that not what a manager does?? What exactly is the duties of a manger?? And while on the topic, the jobs of a Publicist, Booking agent, etc..??

http://www.artistmanagementresource.com/music-manager-roles.html is an article that outlines what various "managers" think they are supposed to do.

Generally one does not "hire" a manager until there is a substantial amount of business for someone to "manage".
#5
I'd say unless you guys have enough cash or really are too busy to not deal with booking/promoters/etc designate the most business oriented member to do most of that stuff.

disclaimer: I'm speaking from my ass here
#6
You need to sit down with your manager and talk to him about what he sees his job as being.

You should have had this conversation before you signed with him, but now is better than never.

Listen to what he describes as his job, understand what services he is offering, and decide if they're worth it. Afterwards, huddle with the band and decide if he's somebody you want to be working with.
#7
What is your agreement with this manager?

See, I would suggest this: Pay him a percentage of the band's net profits. That makes it in his best interest to ensure that you get money, which means gigs. If he doesn't get you gigs, he doesn't make any money.

Have the agreement to be renewable every four months. At the end of four months, sit down with him and discuss renewal.

"How much money have we made under your leadership? And by extension, how much money have YOU made through this agreement?"

If the answer is "not bloody much" then you have some things to talk about before renewing with him.

It should be made clear from the outset what is expected of him by the band, and what is expected of the band by him.

A "real" manager will tell you when you have gigs - not ask you if you want them. A "real" manager will tell you what your ten best songs are to put on your album based on crowd response at gigs, etc. A "real" manager will arrange your gear rental, accommodations and travel insurance for tours. A "real" manager will arrange interviews with media and print press in advance of shows and call programming directors to get your songs played on the radio.

Basically, if it involves spending or making money, or if it involves increasing the band's profile/publicity, then the manager should have his hand in it.

His role will be to free you up from the chores of managing the band so that you can concentrate on your product - the music - which is hopefully what you do best. Anything that distracts you from that should be someone else's job as soon as those other distractions are interfering with your ability to create, and as soon as the expense of hiring that person makes sense.

Just like the manager of a store is in charge of ordering stock, managing staff, ensuring the store is clean, paying the bills, etc., a band manager runs the business of the band. In effect, you are hiring your boss when you take on a manager. However, it should be pointed out that, even though he is the manager, you are still the owners of the business, so he needs to be accountable to you also.

Now really big bands find that this is just too much for a single person to do. They have separate booking agents, tour managers, publicists, etc.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.