#1
I am looking to start recording some songs pretty soon and I need some help getting a good tone for these songs. I have a sound clip of what I am using now and I was wondering can you guys give me some pointers on what I need to do to get a great recording tone? I am using a Schecter Damien Elite Solo 6 with EMG 81/85s and a ToneLab ST for my amp and cab simulations.

Here is the clip for you: http://dl.dropbox.com/u/7554904/Output%201-2.mp3

Thanks!
#2
I would at least double track each part, pan one left around 60-80%, one right around the same. Fiddle with the EQ on each separate track to get a fatter sound out of your guitars.
#3
They are all double tracked besides the first guitar that is heard. When it kicks in all of them are panned and double tracked except for the lead riff which I was told with the harmonies on it to pan it to direct center and only have on track of it.
#4
I have not done anything with the EQ yet. Any suggestions? I feel like it has a little to much treble but I'm not sure if my ears are over exaggerating it because my previous tone before this one had a lot more treble on it.
#5
Interesting. That's one approach, I've got some samples of my technique on my profile here and you can maybe see for yourself. I always pan harmonies, especially. But the tone you have would work, I would think. Once you have the bass and drums in there, with some EQing and some light compression, it'll rock.
#6
A bit too much treble indeed. All tracks need a bit of a cut around the 8k range. Slight dip (3db or so) but with a bit of a broad Q. Also, in general, your mids seemed to be scooped coming in from your amp.

Panning is also an art form. We can't really tell you what to do, but I'd record double tracks of rhythm chords and pan them about 80% on each side, doubles of the lower harmony and pan them around 50% on each side, and double the upper harmonies as well and pan them around 40%, but fiddle with the numbers a bit. Seem like a lot of tracks? Well, what you're going for is a thick mix, and that's the best way to achieve your desired sound
Quote by sporkman7
so what wierd things can u guys do? no not like laser vision or meat vision or something, but like random stuff that usually comes in handy
#7
That could be, but ultimately, if it sounds good to you, make the other instruments work with your guitar tone. I'd probably cut a little off the treble, raise the bass a bit, then play with mids until its sparkling.
#8
Ok I will try all of you guys suggestions. Thank you everyone! If anyone has anymore suggestions just leave them here and I will check in the morning. I hope I can get it to sound good!
#9
Quote by The Raven
That could be, but ultimately, if it sounds good to you, make the other instruments work with your guitar tone. I'd probably cut a little off the treble, raise the bass a bit, then play with mids until its sparkling.

It really depends on the instrument that's supposed to be the center of attention, as well as the genre. Everything has to sit well in the mix. Imagine how much room a huge metal kick would take up in that mix. Now throw in a bass as well, and you'll run into mud issues with the low end of the guitar, and you'll start losing the bass. This is generally why metal kick drums are all triggered, compressed to hell, and disgustingly clicky nowadays
Quote by sporkman7
so what wierd things can u guys do? no not like laser vision or meat vision or something, but like random stuff that usually comes in handy
#11
I think most of the problem with that recording is you're not locked in time with yourself well enough, so it sounds jumbly. Also: try reducing gain a bit.
#12
http://www.ultimatemetal.com/forum/andy-sneap/674724-systematic-mixing-series-1-poking-holes-high-gain-guitars.html

This is an awesome guide tbh, I use the techniques similar to the ones here, and I get really articulate tones while recording. I usually quad track if I play tight enough that day, it's hard but it definitely results in the in-your-face wall of sound.

You should also check out Slipperman's guide to recording metal guitars, I seriously love that thing.
*chugga chugga chuggity chug chug chug*
#13
Ok I will check out all of those guides and I will reduce my gain for sure. I have been getting better and better at playing tight when double tracking but is there any way to help my get much better seeing as some parts are very off?
#14
Would tracking my drum tracks help in my timing at all do you think? I notice that the metronome can get lost in the recording sometimes and maybe if the drums are tracked and on time would that affect my playing considerably?