#1
Hey, I sold my Gt-10 because I did not like the sound very much, and so far I got:

RC-3 loop pedal
Electro harmonix Knockout pedal
and I borrowed my friends metal zone.

I am playing on a Peavey Classic 30 tube amp.


When I go...

Guitar--->RC-3 Loop ---> Amp
I automatically get a "shhhhh" noise. I tried using batteries, took out the daisy chain and plugged only the RC-3 to the power adapter... nothing worked. I still get this constant "shhhhh" noise.

I don't hear it when I play, but its not dead silent like I want it to be.

When I go for...

Guitar--->metal zone ---> Amp
if the distortion pedal is turned off, its dead silent on clean.


and when I go for...

Guitar--->Electro harmonix Knockout pedal---> Amp

I get some very minor background noises, but the odd thing is that they go away when I touch the pedal itself, or the metal knobs on the guitar.
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These extra noises aren't game breaking, and you can't hear them when I play, but I really enjoy having a dead silent clean sound when not playing.

Anyone got any suggestions??
#2
Sounds like you have a ground problem, most likely it's inside the guitar itself. I have an RC-3 and have had no such sort of problems at all. I even run it after my NS-2. Maybe look inside the guitar at the wires, look for cold solder joints, broken solder joints, loose wires, broken wires, etc. Cold/broken solder joints will have a more dull greyish color to them compared to a good one being more shiny as a rule. The loss of ground could be anywhere on the PUPS, control knobs, or even what it is grounding to, ie. the metal parts inside the guitar. Also, as you add pedals you will add noise, so maybe your next purchase could be a noise suppressor/gate of some kind.
#3
i agree with the post above. look at the Boss NS-2 noise suppressor, it is an amazing pedal.
#4
Just to add some of my own advice, as said before check the grounds in the guitar (input jack, pots, pickups, anything with wires going to it). If you have another guitar you can plug in, try that and see if it's the guitar or the pedal.

If it is the pedal, check wiring in that too. It sounds a lot like a ground issue, and or perhaps an input jack issue on the pedal. Mess around and try to isolate variables, but don't fret because your dilemma doesn't sound expensive or, even at it's worst, time consuming. One question: are you running the pedals into an effects loop or into the front of the amp? Also bad volume leveling will cause excess background noise.
I am the crack in the wall, The eye in the sky.
I am the final slumber, The great divide.
I am the silence in madness, That lies to your face,
My woe is accepted, 'tis the end of your race.
#5
Thanks a lot for the tips. My guitar never really had issues before with the GT-10 so I didn't consider it to be the culprit, but I'll try another one. Luckily my friend left his les paul at my house.

Quote by Metal_Master_0
Just to add some of my own advice, as said before check the grounds in the guitar (input jack, pots, pickups, anything with wires going to it). If you have another guitar you can plug in, try that and see if it's the guitar or the pedal.

If it is the pedal, check wiring in that too. It sounds a lot like a ground issue, and or perhaps an input jack issue on the pedal. Mess around and try to isolate variables, but don't fret because your dilemma doesn't sound expensive or, even at it's worst, time consuming. One question: are you running the pedals into an effects loop or into the front of the amp? Also bad volume leveling will cause excess background noise.


I am currently running everything in the front, eventually I will make a switch to effects loops, I just started my pedal purchases so I'm still learning.