#1
Is it worth it to install a guitar nut and saddle made out of TUSQ bone into my Yamaha FG730S?

Will the sound drastically change? In what way? What kind of saddles does my guitar even have? Is it plastic?

It seems as though my only options in my area are tusq and plastic, no corian nor actual bone. The tusq installation will cost about $60-80ish.
#2
I'm having a hard time finding what kind of saddle material is on your guitar to begin with, but I suspect that it's plastic as opposed to TusQ. The difference is probably large enough to warrant a change, but not for the price you're paying.

I would suggest that maybe you try to install the saddle yourself. All it really requires is that you sand it down with fine grit sandpaper so that it fits right. Just match it to the height of your current saddle and round out the edges. The fit should be snug, not tight nor loose. That's about it.

I installed my own fossilized walrus ivory saddle in about an hour, although I'm sure I could have done it a lot faster if I weren't so scared of messing it up, haha.
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#3
Quote by captivate
I'm having a hard time finding what kind of saddle material is on your guitar to begin with, but I suspect that it's plastic as opposed to TusQ. The difference is probably large enough to warrant a change, but not for the price you're paying.

I would suggest that maybe you try to install the saddle yourself. All it really requires is that you sand it down with fine grit sandpaper so that it fits right. Just match it to the height of your current saddle and round out the edges. The fit should be snug, not tight nor loose. That's about it.

I installed my own fossilized walrus ivory saddle in about an hour, although I'm sure I could have done it a lot faster if I weren't so scared of messing it up, haha.


The installation fee might be expensive according to where you live, but I live in Sweden - the country where everything is expensive compared to other countries. :p

Anyways, I rather not try to install it myself since I do not want to risk over sanding down :p.
#4
Parts and labour you're looking at about 100 bucks to have someone else do it. (assuming you're going to upgrade the nut too). You'll find your sustain will be moderately better, as the bone is harder than the plastic. However i'm fairly sure those yamahas are fully laminated, so you have to ask yourself whether it's a worthwhile investment or not. I'd put the money aside for a solid wood, or at least solid top guitar, and go from there.
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Quote by stepchildusmc
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#5
Quote by mike_oxbig
Parts and labour you're looking at about 100 bucks to have someone else do it. (assuming you're going to upgrade the nut too). You'll find your sustain will be moderately better, as the bone is harder than the plastic. However i'm fairly sure those yamahas are fully laminated, so you have to ask yourself whether it's a worthwhile investment or not. I'd put the money aside for a solid wood, or at least solid top guitar, and go from there.


The 730s is a solid top. I won't be buying a solid wood until further into the future :p
#6
I'm doing the same thing. I'm replacing the saddle on my FG700S with a bone saddle. I just need it to arrive in the mail...Plus I'm going down a gauge with strings. I want to brighten the sound on my guitar and add sustain. The bridge pins were already replaced with brass. That helped a little bit.
#7
yes, it's plastic on the 730 - i asked a yamaha rep when i got mine. whether you'll find tusq an improvement depends on your own preferences, but don't expect a huge difference, although there will be some. i would expect more of a difference in tone with bone, but you can often get a larger change in tone by changing to different types of strings.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#8
I know I shouldn't be asking the questions, but what's the difference between tusq and bone? Would brass work as a good saddle too?
#9
tusq is synthetic.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#10
Quote by patticake
yes, it's plastic on the 730 - i asked a yamaha rep when i got mine. whether you'll find tusq an improvement depends on your own preferences, but don't expect a huge difference, although there will be some. i would expect more of a difference in tone with bone, but you can often get a larger change in tone by changing to different types of strings.


What strings do you suggest to get on a FG730S. I really don't know what kind of sound
I want to have considering I try to play with as much variety as possible to expand my range - so what would be a good all-round set of strings, preferably with a long-life performance?

Right now, I've been playing on the stock strings the guitar came with which are the Yamaha FS50BT. To be honest, they haven't discolored out of rust since I bought them 4-5months ago and still sounds pretty neat (ultra perfect none-sweaty hands), but if there are better strings out there I'd like to know!
#11
those yamaha strings really don't sound very good. for me, almost any string sounds better. you might want to try the following for a variety of tones: d'addario phosphor bronze, DR rare phosphor bronze, thomastik plectrums, and if you like a warm, mellow tone, martin silk & steels. these will give your guitar a variety of tones, but be sure to give each set of strings 3 to 5 days to settle in as new strings have a different (and to me, unpleasant) sound compared to those that have had time to lose that new string sound.

Quote by drteletubbie
What strings do you suggest to get on a FG730S. I really don't know what kind of sound
I want to have considering I try to play with as much variety as possible to expand my range - so what would be a good all-round set of strings, preferably with a long-life performance?

Right now, I've been playing on the stock strings the guitar came with which are the Yamaha FS50BT. To be honest, they haven't discolored out of rust since I bought them 4-5months ago and still sounds pretty neat (ultra perfect none-sweaty hands), but if there are better strings out there I'd like to know!
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#12
This subject has come up a few times over the years. It appears that there is some real tusq or tusk out there that is certifided for musical instruments, however it will cost you. I have tried ivory with varying results. If you take all the different types of material and drop them onto a glass counter you will hear the different sounds. The plastics are more of a dull thud the more exotic
materials produce a nice ping. Hey what can say try it. Cheers
#13
Quote by tuxs
This subject has come up a few times over the years. It appears that there is some real tusq or tusk out there that is certifided for musical instruments, however it will cost you. I have tried ivory with varying results. If you take all the different types of material and drop them onto a glass counter you will hear the different sounds. The plastics are more of a dull thud the more exotic
materials produce a nice ping. Hey what can say try it. Cheers


That's a pretty poor way of deciphering the tonal difference of those materials. How about playing different guitars with those installed and let your ears decide?

Man-made Tusq is one step above plastic tonally. Bone comes next, and this can be quite varied. Bone from which animal, or from which part of that animal? How old is it?Ivory goes up from there, and one needs to be cautious here as certain animals ivory is illegal to own. Brass is a non-issue as it's not suited for saddle or nut material at all. It's too dense and won't transfer the vibrational energy as well as the others.

A readily available chunk of bone for the saddle material would do wonders if upgrading from a plastic factory one. They are easy to work and shape to match the original and don't require much time. The majority of the work can be done on a flat surface with sandpaper of varying grades.
#14
That's a pretty poor way of deciphering the tonal difference of those materials. How about playing different guitars with those installed and let your ears decide?

Not a poor way at all, it demonstrates quite clearly the tonal differences. You can play all the guitars you like its not going to sound anything like your guitar. As for being illegal I already stated that
some ivory is certifide. Cheers
#15
Quote by tuxs


Not a poor way at all, it demonstrates quite clearly the tonal differences. You can play all the guitars you like its not going to sound anything like your guitar. As for being illegal I already stated that
some ivory is certifide. Cheers


What I meant was that you're leaving one major thing out of the equasion there by just randomly dropping saddles of different materials onto a countertop and listening to the sounds they make as they land. There's no guitar you see. There are enough guitars available to play with those different materials installed from the factory to get a decent idea of their tonal differences. Of course they're not the guitar(s) you own, but one can still get a better idea of what the guitar will sound like with them in. After all, ultimately it's the guitar you'll be listening to, not the drop of a saddle onto a counter. Why not let your ears experience the entire package? Then decide which you like best.