#1
So the licensed Floyd on my Dean is about to be thrown out the nearest window. I'm trying to decide which bridge would be best for what I need. I'm thinking between the Schaller model or a Floyd Special, I use thick strings(10-52) for Eb standard. I like to get the most out of the bridge, ie bombs, squeals and flairs with the arm. Any input would be great.
Quote by LesPaulHer0
"in the grand scheme of things, nobody cares"



Gear:
Dean 10K Commemorative Razorback
Ibanez RG 3EX1
BC Rich Mockingbird Evil Edge
Fender Acoustic
Marshall MG250DFX
Ibanez Weeping Demon Wah
Electro Harmonix Small Clone Full Chorus
#2
Get a Schaller or a Gotoh.
Quote by Tone Deaf
Someone has had too much jager in their slushy. :/
Quote by CL/\SH
First person on UG to be a grammar nazi and use the correct form of "your" in the correct context.

+ 70 virgins to you, my good sir.

Quote by Fassa Albrecht
Girls DO fap...I don't though.
#3
get an original floyd rose, 10 times better than the specials or the licensed ones
My Gear:
BC Rich Gunslinger Retro Blade
Vintage V100 Paradise + SD Alnico Pro Slash APH-2's
1963 Burns Short Scale Jazz Guitar
Dean Performer Florentine
Bugera 6260
Orange Micro Terror + cab
Digitech Bad Monkey
Zoom G2G
#4
The LFR in the Razorbacks is a quality bridge , it's on par with Peavey's and Jackson's design (minus the nifty collet arm). If you're having problems setting that one up moving to an OFR wouldn't even help you much.

I've had mine since 2006 and been abusing it ever since, I can divebomb to hell and back with loose floppy strings and not loose tuning. What problems is it giving you? If it's not returning to pitch either you haven't stretched the strings out enough or you're not cleaning the pivot points when you change strings, a little bit of chapstick on the pivots will lubricate it and let it return to pitch easier
Endorsed by Dean Guitars 07-10
2003 Gibson Flying V w/ Moon Inlay
2006 Fender All-American Partscaster
SVK ELP-C500 Custom

1964 Fender Vibro Champ
1989 Peavey VTM60

[thread="1166208"]Gibsons Historic Designs[/thread]
Last edited by Flux'D at Dec 29, 2011,
#5
well I had it replaced under warranty, there was an issue with the saddles. and now I've noticed that after only 2 string changes the screw to clamp the string in place is stripped. also the arm on the current bridge doesn't remain in any given position, it's either flopping around or stuck in a fixed and very solid position. It's set up properly, but I've had many problems with keeping the strings in the saddle, despite buying new blocks.
Quote by LesPaulHer0
"in the grand scheme of things, nobody cares"



Gear:
Dean 10K Commemorative Razorback
Ibanez RG 3EX1
BC Rich Mockingbird Evil Edge
Fender Acoustic
Marshall MG250DFX
Ibanez Weeping Demon Wah
Electro Harmonix Small Clone Full Chorus
#6
Quote by Dirt Bag Boy
well I had it replaced under warranty, there was an issue with the saddles. and now I've noticed that after only 2 string changes the screw to clamp the string in place is stripped. also the arm on the current bridge doesn't remain in any given position, it's either flopping around or stuck in a fixed and very solid position. It's set up properly, but I've had many problems with keeping the strings in the saddle, despite buying new blocks.


There is no substitute for the real deal. If you want your problems to go away, buy a OFR (NOT the special) or a Schaller (I think the Schaller is superior, but to each his own).
#7
If the screws are stripped you are tightening them down way too hard, which would also explain the blocks not holding the strings. I've seen this exact problem on a Jackson DK2 that I worked on a few months ago. Those little blocks get indentions from the strings over time (or if you crank 'em down with a gorilla arm) and when you switch gauges the wear marks are bigger than the strings. Which would cause them to slip loose. Also if you've swapped saddles around the wear marks would cause certain size strings to slip out.

What you can do is move the problem block down a saddle, towards the bass side. Example, the if the G string block is giving you trouble, move it down to the D string saddle. The G string's wear marks will definitely be smaller than the D string and it should clamp the D effectively. If the original D block (hah, that's a breaker company..) doesn't have pronounced wear marks it should work in the G saddle. Sometimes it takes a minute or two to move them around to where everything clamps right.

The tremolo arm... that's just the nature of the beast. Every arm that screws in is like that (vintage strat style, LFR's, Kahler flat mounts, etc). Jackson and the OFR have a collet system to where the arm can swing around at the same tension.
Endorsed by Dean Guitars 07-10
2003 Gibson Flying V w/ Moon Inlay
2006 Fender All-American Partscaster
SVK ELP-C500 Custom

1964 Fender Vibro Champ
1989 Peavey VTM60

[thread="1166208"]Gibsons Historic Designs[/thread]
#8
Quote by Dirt Bag Boy
well I had it replaced under warranty, there was an issue with the saddles. and now I've noticed that after only 2 string changes the screw to clamp the string in place is stripped. also the arm on the current bridge doesn't remain in any given position, it's either flopping around or stuck in a fixed and very solid position. It's set up properly, but I've had many problems with keeping the strings in the saddle, despite buying new blocks.


I'm gonna be a dick here, and say that if you changed the strings, that part was probably your fault.
#9
licensed floyds are solid, replace broken parts, dont tighten things as much
Quote by kangaxxter
The only real answer to the SG vs Les Paul debate is to get a Flying V and laugh at all the suckers who don't have one.


Quote by Blompcube

if you embrace inaccurate intonation it can be quite arousing.


I <3 TWEED
#10
Just please make sure the model of floyd you are buying matches the fretboard radius of your dean. This is why replacing floyd's are a pain in the ass on cheap guitars: It's hard to find a drop in replacement for certain cheaper models.
Yes, a slightly different radius would probably be compatible, but it won't be at its optimum playability, considering the fact that that each individual saddle is non adjustable height wise.
#11
You can easily shim the saddle on a Floyd to change the height. All you need are a few different thicknesses of brass shims.

edit: easy is a relative term when talking about anything to do with a Floyd.