#1
in the animals as leaders song 'behaving badly' there is a b chord used, through looking at the notes ive deduced it contains not only the root (b) & the fifth (f#) but also the notes c# (2nd) and e (4th) making it some kind of suspension i assume - but what kind!? what is it!?
surely it cant be an 11th because ive checked and there is no d# (3rd) or a# (7th) and i know that the R 3rd 7th and 11th (which would be e in this case) are the required notes to make an 11th chord

i dont know if im just being retarded or what so any help'd be great!
#3
That's a double suspension. It's just a chord with suspended 4th and 2nd (or 9th) occurring simultaneously. I don't know the song or the context in which this chord arises, but if it resolves properly, then the 4th will fall to a 3rd, and the the 9th will resolve to the octave.



EDIT: sorry for the dismal graphic
and that's in treble clef by the way
Last edited by National_Anthem at Dec 29, 2011,
#5
Quote by griffRG7321
This^

How's that paper going?



Somehow I knew I'd find you in here. I'll start it next year, I've just been doing some little bits of arrangement in the last few days. Coursework

Something that's always puzzled me is why in pop music, people call sus chords suspensions, even when the dissonance isn't prepared or resolved, and thus isn't really suspended, just added. Isn't that what add chords are supposed to be?
#7
Quote by National_Anthem

Somehow I knew I'd find you in here. I'll start it next year, I've just been doing some little bits of arrangement in the last few days. Coursework

Something that's always puzzled me is why in pop music, people call sus chords suspensions, even when the dissonance isn't prepared or resolved, and thus isn't really suspended, just added. Isn't that what add chords are supposed to be?


In pop music a sus chord is a major or minor triad with the third replaced by a 2nd/9th or 4th/11th. In the unlikely cirumstance that it's resolved I suppose it would be considered an appoggiatura if it isn't prepared

Add chords are a major or minor chord with an 'added' 9th or 11th.

Maj9 is a major 7th chord with an added 9th, think those copland-esque chords of stacking a dominant triad on the tonic one.
#8
Quote by griffRG7321
In pop music a sus chord is a major or minor triad with the third replaced by a 2nd/9th or 4th/11th. In the unlikely cirumstance that it's resolved I suppose it would be considered an appoggiatura if it isn't prepared

Add chords are a major or minor chord with an 'added' 9th or 11th.

Maj9 is a major 7th chord with an added 9th, think those copland-esque chords of stacking a dominant triad on the tonic one.


Yeah, I just see sus written in tabs, and in jazz scores so often, and they are rarely prepared or resolved. The whole concept of suspension is incompatible with a chord based approach to harmony: my point is, just by inserting a 'sus' chord into a piece, you don't immediately have a genuine suspension, because suspensions are a contrapuntal phenomena. No preparation, no suspension.

I get confused with jazz/pop notation, I do everything in figures.
#9
I use figures sometimes, I use extended roman more though, like V7 V7d etc. With that you can actually see what's going on instead of just seeing 'C maj7'.

Not entirely sure how sus came to be used as a chord name though.
#10
Quote by griffRG7321
Not entirely sure how sus came to be used as a chord name though.


Good ol' Wiki says:

"The term is borrowed from the contrapuntal technique of suspension, where a note from a previous chord is carried over to the next chord, and then resolved down to the third or tonic, suspending a note from the previous chord. However, in modern usage, the term concerns only the notes played at a given time; in a suspended chord the added tone does not necessarily resolve, and is not necessarily "prepared" (i.e., held over) from the prior chord. As such, in C-F-G, F would resolve to E, but in rock and popular music, "the term is used to indicate only the harmonic structure, with no implications about what comes before or after," though preparation of the fourth occurs about half the time and traditional resolution of the fourth occurs usually."