#2
Quote by dannydawiz
I've been hearing this term alot lately and I'm extremely curious on what it is.

Could someone please explain to me what it is and where I may be able to find more information on it?



Hey Danny, hope things are well with you.


Here's a simplistic approach that gets to the gist of this.

Play a static Bass note. Say E. Keep it droning and don't change it to another note.

Over that static play Modes etc. Play E Phrygian, E Lydian, E Dorian. You play different scales and resolve them over the same pitch, "E".

Voila!

Best,

Sean
#4
Thanks Sean Its great to be taking advice from you again!

Since all of those different modes resolve back to an E you can choose from any one of the 7 modes to play over that E.

From the place that I first heard that term there is also a statement saying that understanding it can help you construct chord melodys.

How would you that type of knowledge to playing chords?
#6
Quote by dannydawiz
Thanks Sean Its great to be taking advice from you again!

Since all of those different modes resolve back to an E you can choose from any one of the 7 modes to play over that E.

From the place that I first heard that term there is also a statement saying that understanding it can help you construct chord melodys.

How would you that type of knowledge to playing chords?


Each scale and their intervals can change from one mode to the next, changing the "diatonic" chord that can be possible from it. This makes a different chord possibility off the root, so in Phrygian you might have a Em7b9 and Lydian an Emaj7#11, for example.

Best,

Sean
#7
Not of this earth
Satch Boogie
Lords of karma
Raspberry jam
Clouds race across the sky
Engines of creation
With jupiter in mind

Some Satriani tracks that use pitch axis theory off the top of my head.
#8
What Sean said. Joe Satriani is a real pioneer of the pitch axis. You just basically change modes within one tonal center(tonal-pitch center-axis) I was gonna do a lesson on this but, I thought ppl didn't have interest. Wha a fool I am
#9
Quote by griffRG7321
Not of this earth
Satch Boogie
Lords of karma
Raspberry jam
Clouds race across the sky
Engines of creation
With jupiter in mind

Some Satriani tracks that use pitch axis theory off the top of my head.



You forgot Always with me always with you. A really basic example compared to Not Of This Earth don't ya think
#10
I wouldn't call that pitch axis theory, that's just switching to the parallel minor.

And Not of this earth is probably the most celebrated example i can think of.
#11
Quote by dannydawiz
Thanks Sean Its great to be taking advice from you again!

Since all of those different modes resolve back to an E you can choose from any one of the 7 modes to play over that E.

How would you that type of knowledge to playing chords?

You can construct chords from scales that share the same common tonal centre, far beyond the confines of the diatonic modes, regardless of how exotic they might be, or their lack of modal relation to the major scale.
From the place that I first heard that term there is also a statement saying that understanding it can help you construct chord melodys.

Yes, this approach can yield more possibility for melody. As you borrow a chord from another mode, the correlating scale from which melodies can be constructed also changes. This allows you to break out of the diatonic sound and use more interesting note choices.

Edit: With regard to melody, I mentioned "diatonic sound". This would be more associated with modal interchange, however the two are closely related topics.

Hopefully you get the idea.
Last edited by mdc at Jan 5, 2012,
#12
Quote by mdc
You can construct chords from scales that share the same common tonal centre, far beyond the confines of the diatonic modes, regardless of how exotic they might be, or their lack of modal relation to the major scale.



Right, because that tonal center IS the resolution, even if only temporary, almost like a excursion away from the diatonic tonal center.

For example, you might have started in C Major, but when you decide to go into Em, (the iii in C major) and create an extended break using E as your pitch axis to base exploration from, then for all intents and purposes, since E is the drone and central tone, until you break from that, the center changes to E.

Best,

Sean
#13
Quote by Sean0913
Right, because that tonal center IS the resolution, even if only temporary, almost like a excursion away from the diatonic tonal center.

For example, you might have started in C Major, but when you decide to go into Em, (the iii in C major) and create an extended break using E as your pitch axis to base exploration from, then for all intents and purposes, since E is the drone and central tone, until you break from that, the center changes to E.

Best,

Sean

Yup. I also forgot to mention that in pitch axis, the idea is to stretch the harmony as far as you want without losing the overall tonal center.
#14
Quote by Sean0913
Right, because that tonal center IS the resolution, even if only temporary, almost like a excursion away from the diatonic tonal center.

For example, you might have started in C Major, but when you decide to go into Em, (the iii in C major) and create an extended break using E as your pitch axis to base exploration from, then for all intents and purposes, since E is the drone and central tone, until you break from that, the center changes to E.

Best,

Sean

You hear that all the time in Satriani's stuff, he drops out of the main chord progression and jams on a vamp or similar for a bit before bringing it all back together. The tapping section in Satch Boogie and the solos in Ice 9 spring to mind.

That's one thing that seems to get forgotten when people get all hung up on modes - the listener. Doesn't matter what notes or chords you're playing, it takes time for a listener to register a shift in tonal centre. If you just drop an out of key chord in a diatonic progression then it's not going to affect the listener that much, they'll probably instinctively know it's "off" but they'll still be looking for that resolution to the tonic.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#16
Quote by Sean0913
Hey Danny, hope things are well with you.


Here's a simplistic approach that gets to the gist of this.

Play a static Bass note. Say E. Keep it droning and don't change it to another note.

Over that static play Modes etc. Play E Phrygian, E Lydian, E Dorian. You play different scales and resolve them over the same pitch, "E".

Voila!

Best,

Sean

+1