#1
Hi, I'm writing something which I believe to be in G minor (Bb and Eb, right?) but the piece starts on an A and pretty much revolves round that, i'm fairly new to this, but I'm still in G minor even though it's not really the root note of the piece aren't I?

And if i were to try and modulate into Bb major (the relative major, right?) :') would it be wise to use the Bb as the root note?

Thanks!
#2
An A scale with a Bb and Eb in it is an A Locrian mode, I'm not sure if that's what you're asking. It's a G minor key signature but if you're not starting on and ending on G it's usually not G minor anymore.
But yes in order to go to the relative major, although you don't have to, it would be wise to use Bb as the root.
#3
Either way, the key signature will say that B's are flat and E's are flat. You're not in G minor if it doesn't resolve to G. It doesn't matter where it starts or ends, just where it resolves. Does it resolve to A major or A minor?

If you modulate to Bb major, it's understood that Bb is the root note in Bb major.

Bottom line, play what sounds good to you.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#5
Looks like G minor with melodic minor play on the E. Don't take my word for it, though. I'm no good reading anything but treble clef.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#6
Quote by metal4all
Looks like G minor with melodic minor play on the E. Don't take my word for it, though. I'm no good reading anything but treble clef.


I've looked at your score- some nice menacing motifs there

To my ear, what you've put in there wants to go home to D every time, which makes my want to say it's in the key of D minor, just using an Eb accidental as a passing note.
#7
Thanks to all of you for your help! I e-mailed one of my lecturers and this is the advice she gave me...

'The bass line keeps resolving back to the D. You use longer notes in the bass for the D, F, and A, which are the notes in a D minor triad. On the bottom line of page 19 you use a low D, then an A (the fifth note in the D minor triad) and then you go up to a higher D to make it sound more complete.
I've noticed the E flat but I'll explain this too. From bars one to three on pg 19 you creep down in semitones from an F, to an E, and E flat then to the D. This is repeated several times, but the chromatic 'creeping' always lands on the D. Therefore you are using a pattern of falling chromatic notes to create the feeling of unease and suspense, I like it! You could therefore explain in your commentary how you have used chromaticism to add tension.'

So that pretty much sums up what a couple of your guys said, thanks for all the help, i'll be back with more questions i'm sure! Thanks!