#1
When I play a note, sometimes a completely different string that I haven't even touched will start to vibrate and makes a small sound. For example, I can fret A on the 3rd string, and my 5th string will start to vibrate. I only noticed this just now (I always thought I was just playing sloppily).
Is this normal?
If not, can it be fixed?
If I'm playing a scale, I'm getting unwanted sounds because other strings are ringing out and it's really annoying.
It's not loud, but noticeable, at least to me.
It always seems to be when I play a note that has an open string, so E, A, D, G and B seem to all cause this same thing.

Or maybe I'm just doing something wrong here, I dunno.
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
when i saw Motorhead, every bass kick shook the place

when they played Overkill at the end i nearly involuntarily shat myself
#2
This is called fret buzz. Google it.

But briefly, raise the strings, your action is too low.

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Quote by stratdud39
Thank you for your words of wisdom.
#3
its called symphathetic vibrations
it sounds real pretty if you can controll it right

but if it bugs you alot work on muting the strings your not playing

EDIT: ignore ^
#4
I was recently told that fret buzz is when you fret something down, that same string buzzes on the frets further down the neck.
Was that incorrect?
What's happening is that open strings start to ring when I play something on another string.
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
when i saw Motorhead, every bass kick shook the place

when they played Overkill at the end i nearly involuntarily shat myself
#5
Better muting is the answer. Both your left And right-handed muting.
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#6
Quote by supersac
its called symphathetic vibrations
it sounds real pretty if you can controll it right

but if it bugs you alot work on muting the strings your not playing

EDIT: ignore ^


This. Work on using your fret hand to mute all unplayed strings.
#7
Quote by Concurssi
I was recently told that fret buzz is when you fret something down, that same string buzzes on the frets further down the neck.
Was that incorrect?
What's happening is that open strings start to ring when I play something on another string.


Sorry, I misread. Yeah this problem is more common on guitars with a tremolo (I've had it on my own floyd). Like others have correctly said, mute the strings.

Schecter C-1 Hellraiser FR
ESP LTD MH-1000NT
Marshall AVT100
Boss ME-70

Quote by stratdud39
Thank you for your words of wisdom.
#8
Every string does that. When you play a string the others will vibrate as well. It's easily heard in acoustic guitars. Play the low E and let it ring. Then mute the high e, B, G, D and A strings one by one and you will noticed the difference. This happens because the low E (82.41 Hz) "stimulates" (might not be the right word, but it works) the high e, which vibrates at a rate of 329.63 Hz, which is four times the amount of Hz of the low E
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Last edited by SupahStrat at Dec 31, 2011,
#9
You sure it happens on every string bud?
Maybe it does, but I only notice the note and it's open string equivalent.
Trying to mute the other strings does nothing in my hearing.
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
when i saw Motorhead, every bass kick shook the place

when they played Overkill at the end i nearly involuntarily shat myself
#10
lol i've been having the same problem, except, along with the guitar strings, one of the springs holding my bridge is resonating aswell :P
SH*T, IT'S MY GEAR!

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#11
Quote by Concurssi
You sure it happens on every string bud?
Maybe it does, but I only notice the note and it's open string equivalent.
Trying to mute the other strings does nothing in my hearing.


Let me say one thing first, English isn't my first language so I may mess up

So, yes. It happens on every string, I play the violin (fiddle w/e you wanna call it) and when I play the D string, the A string vibrates as well even though they're not the same note, this is because they (antonym for dissonant???) "sound well together" (will replace when somebody tells me the antonym for dissonance).

When you fret D in any string on the guitar, and play the open D string, the fretted D will vibrate as well, of course, to a lesser extent than for example low E vs high e. But if you fret a G sharp and play the A string it will never vibrate because they are dissonant. I hear it mostly on acoustic, I play an E chord and then I mute each string one by one and the fullness and richness of the chord just fades because it needs the other strings for it to sound actually good!
Gibson Firebird 70s Tribute
Orange TH30
Zilla 2x12 Fatboy
Big Muff Pi
#12
Consonance?

So if the notes are 'consonant', then an open string might ring out?
Okay, sweet.
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
when i saw Motorhead, every bass kick shook the place

when they played Overkill at the end i nearly involuntarily shat myself
#13
Quote by guitargasm6
lol i've been having the same problem, except, along with the guitar strings, one of the springs holding my bridge is resonating aswell :P

I hate when that happens. Or one of the tuners. Or something I can't even find. At least with springs you can change the tension and move the sympathetic vibration to a different note. If you're lucky you can get to somewhere between 'real' notes. Or wrap tape on it or put a piece of foam under it to inhibit the vibration.

Back to the original complaint, check where you are in relation to the amp. If you are directly in front of it, the effect will be greater.

It's really much more common on acoustic instruments. Sometimes a person's voice (especially laughing or something else loud) will hit the right note and the guitar will sing back. Its kinda funny when you dont know where its coming from.
Last edited by RebuildIt at Jan 1, 2012,