#1
Ok, so apparently I am completely in the dark as far as pickups go. I own a strat and, if looking at the guitar from a neck pointing up perspective, it has a single coil, another single coil below it, and a humbucker below that. I cannot for the life of me find information regarding what position on the pickup switch is the bridge or neck pickup setting. So I'm asking here.
1. If the toggle switch that changes pickup settings is pointing away from the guitar, am I in the neck or bridge setting?

2. I have been reading that the neck/middle/bridge pickup settings each have different intonations. Is this because of their location on the guitar or because I have a humbucker or a single coil as that pickup?
#2
To answer your questions...
1. If you mean that the switch is pointing towards the Neck of your guitar (or in that general direction), then you are using the Neck pickup. If you move the switch to the next position, you are using the Middle and Neck pickups together. In the next position, you're using the Middle pickup alone, in the next position, you're using the Middle pickup and One coil of the Bridge humbucker. In the last position (the one pointing away from the neck), you're using the Bridge humbucker.

2. Each pickup has a different tonal quality because of several factors. One is it's placement. A pickup placed closer to the bridge will naturally have a brighter tone with more "bite". A pickup placed closer to the neck will naturally have a bassier, smoother tone. To make sense of this, unplug your guitar and pluck the string Right in front of the bridge. Then pluck the string where the neck meets the body. You'll hear a distinct difference in tone.

Another factor is the construction of the pickup. A Humbucker is essentially 2 single coil pickups wired together in series. Because of this, they tend to have a much higher output than single coils. Also, because they have a higher DC resistance (which is caused by more turns of wire being used), they tend to have a warmer, darker tone compared to single coils (though this isn't absolute; I've heard many very bright humbuckers).

Hopefully this clears up some of your questions.
Acoustics:
1994 Seagull SM6
2007 Takamine G5013SVFT

Electrics:
2008 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain Top (Cherryburst)
1964 Gibson Melody Maker D (DC)

Amps:
Traynor YGL-1

Pedals
MXR Distortion III (C4 Modded)
#3
Darn. So even though I'm in the bridge setting I am not going to get a relatively clean, trebley tone because my bridge pickup is a humbucker as opposed to a single coil?
#5
Quote by FearMyLightning
When it sounds br00tal you're in the bridge position.


^^
This, Forever.
Hell Yea Im Straight Edge!
ESP Eclipse II (or) Fender Strat w/David Gilmour EMGs > Cry Baby Original > Digitech RP250 > JOYO Ultimate Overdrive > MXR BLS Chorus > MXR Phase 90 > EHX Memory Toy > 1981 Marshall JCM800
#7
Quote by Chandleezy
I don't want br00tal... : (


Then get a strat with 3 single coils. Or just don't use the bridge humbucker
Quote by FEngHLyan

She will join the prom.

She insists to wear this lights.

I don't think so.

How can I persuade her?
#8
If you tell me what brand/model of guitar you have, I may have a solution
Acoustics:
1994 Seagull SM6
2007 Takamine G5013SVFT

Electrics:
2008 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain Top (Cherryburst)
1964 Gibson Melody Maker D (DC)

Amps:
Traynor YGL-1

Pedals
MXR Distortion III (C4 Modded)