#1
Hey, Im kinda stuck in a rut, is there any way i can practice to improve my gutair soloing, any exercises or anything? Thanks
#2
Quote by Poisonouspot
Hey, Im kinda stuck in a rut, is there any way i can practice to improve my gutair soloing, any exercises or anything? Thanks
I normally learn a scale then mess around with it. go to guitarvoice.com they have alot of backing tracks in different keys. or you can record a chord progression then mess around with the scale that goes with it.
#3
Phrasing.

Phrasing is the number one most important, yet most over looked thing on the guitar. Phrasing is how you make your guitar talk, put the feeling in, make sure self stand out in the crowd.

You'll find great guitar players with a great advanced theory knowledge, and some with minimal theory knowledge. Some with great technique, some with less technique. The thing they all have in common is great phrasing.

Every one talk about techniques, scales, modes, areppegios etc, but they are all inferier to good phrasing.

Melody is very important to. They say the most memorable solo's are the sing able solos.
Last edited by jkielq91 at Jan 1, 2012,
#4
Quote by Poisonouspot
Hey, Im kinda stuck in a rut, is there any way i can practice to improve my gutair soloing, any exercises or anything? Thanks

Just keep in mind that it's not your technical ability that your solos depend on as much as your musical ability...what makes a solo "good" is whether it's musical, melodic and fits with the backing.

So it's time to start listening properly, listen to other people's solos and really make the effort to understand what they're doing, but pay just as much attention to what the solo is being played over. Listen more closely to what you play too, and constantly ask yourself questions like "did that note fit? Did it work with the chord I was playing over? Did it work with the last notes I played? Where can I go from here?"
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#5
There are many ways you can improve soloing.

One (the most typical and not so great imo) is to learn a bunch of scales. I don't think this is really needed, since most music stick to the major, minor, melodic minor and harmonic minor scales.

One is to learn licks by your favorite guitar players and transpose them to all different keys.

One (in my opinion the hardest, but best) is to "imagine" the sound/lick/thing you want to play and then find it on the guitar. That way you will: 1) always get the sound you want. 2) You will improve at improvising & at picking up stuff by ear.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#6
Quote by Sickz
There are many ways you can improve soloing.

One (the most typical and not so great imo) is to learn a bunch of scales. I don't think this is really needed, since most music stick to the major, minor, melodic minor and harmonic minor scales.

One is to learn licks by your favorite guitar players and transpose them to all different keys.

One (in my opinion the hardest, but best) is to "imagine" the sound/lick/thing you want to play and then find it on the guitar. That way you will: 1) always get the sound you want. 2) You will improve at improvising & at picking up stuff by ear.


You could try singing on humming over the backing track and then working it out on guitar. You'll find that a lot of the sounds and melodies are already with in you, you just need to help them onto the guitar.
#7
What i do is, play a few chords for example Am, then Em, then stick that on loop and just play over it... get better every day!
Irons
#8
Another technique that Paul Gilbert demonstrated in one of his instructional videos is to take a beat; whether it be a drumbeat, beatboxing or what have you. Pick any lick that you know (or even a scale) and play it to that beat. This can also help with your timing.
Acoustics:
1994 Seagull SM6
2007 Takamine G5013SVFT

Electrics:
2008 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain Top (Cherryburst)
1964 Gibson Melody Maker D (DC)

Amps:
Traynor YGL-1

Pedals
MXR Distortion III (C4 Modded)
#9
Quote by jkielq91
You could try singing on humming over the backing track and then working it out on guitar. You'll find that a lot of the sounds and melodies are already with in you, you just need to help them onto the guitar.



Great suggestion
#10
My guitar teacher tells me to sing along as I'm soloing, so I get a feel of melodic phrasing and interval recognition, both from interval to fretboard and interval to sound.
EDIT: sorry it's so similar to other suggestions. The only difference is to try to accurately sing along simultaneously or slightly before you play notes.
Last edited by s guy at Jan 1, 2012,
#11
I think the thing that has improved my phrasing is playing absolutely everything I can and listening to everything I can. A song I just got done with, Absolution (yep, shameless self-promotion), has a number of different solos. One of them is slow and smooth and sounds like a David Gilmour knockoff. Another has some smooth tapping work followed by a more scalar harmonic minor melody like Marty Friedman used in his Cacaphony days. The last solo is in the vein of Jason Becker and AJ Minette and uses a lot of sweep picking and legato work to get a neoclassical sound.

None of those would have been possible if I didn't listen to those artists, play their music, and take the time to try to analyze their styles. Other solos I've done have gotten a sound similar to Thordendal from Meshuggah, another artist whose style I've listened to, analyzed, and incorporated into my own playing.

Good artists imitate. Great artists synthesize. Listen to your influences, because every time someone does something new, he does so standing on the shoulders of his influences.
#12
its all trial and error really, you can figure out what scales are used in the song and just muck around with them till you find something that you like, you can learn different sequences like pedal point, 0-2-3-2-3-5 etc.
the way that i write solos is just putting a loop on guitar and playing over the top of it till i develop ideas and then it basically writes itself from there
#13
Learn a little bit about theory man
"When the power of love over comes the love of power the world will know peace."
~Jimi Hendrix
#14
I'd recommend against learning theory to write solos. Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive. If you switch the two, you end up stuck in a box that's tough to break out of.
#15
One of the best things I like to do is to take a solo I love and then learn how to play it at half speed and make it sound good. You can slow down the speed easily on Windows Media player, for example.

If you can play a solo slow, and it still sounds good, then you know you have nailed it. Too many times, people use speed to hide their lack of expressive ability on the guitar.

Like if you can play the "Black Sabbath" riff on an acoustic guitar (i.e. no effects) without making it sound boring and losing people's attention (e.g. make sure those notes have real feeling in them) you have hit a very important level in your playing.

Playing fast solos slow also makes the solos sound different, and can give you new ideas. It makes you learn how to "breathe" properly in your phrasing as well.
#16
PHRASING! That's the absolutely best way to practice soloing. Pick out some notes on you fretboard (3 is fine) and then practice phrasing.

If you don't know: Phrasing is HOW you play it now What you play.
#17
Quote by Metal-pro
PHRASING! That's the absolutely best way to practice soloing. Pick out some notes on you fretboard (3 is fine) and then practice phrasing.

If you don't know: Phrasing is HOW you play it now What you play.


I saw a video that got you to solo using just the triad notes in the scale, the root, third and 5th, and practice soloing just with those.

They then got you to add the 2nd of the scale and practice soloing with just those notes, and after that the 4th. This helps you to hear which are the safe notes, and how to resolve a phrase, but also how you dont need a lot of notes to play, as long as your phrasing is good, interesting and has feeling.
#18
Let's say your favourite style of guitar playing is rock. Learn to play a jazz guitar song, a blues song, a country song, a reggae song, or a classical guitar song, etc.

You can either find something in a very different style than you normally play or you can learn something that is in a similar or related style.
#19
Quote by jkielq91
I saw a video that got you to solo using just the triad notes in the scale, the root, third and 5th, and practice soloing just with those.

They then got you to add the 2nd of the scale and practice soloing with just those notes, and after that the 4th. This helps you to hear which are the safe notes, and how to resolve a phrase, but also how you dont need a lot of notes to play, as long as your phrasing is good, interesting and has feeling.


Got a link? I could definitely use help with this, and I need to work on my phrasing a lot more.
#20
Quote by jkielq91
I saw a video that got you to solo using just the triad notes in the scale, the root, third and 5th, and practice soloing just with those.

They then got you to add the 2nd of the scale and practice soloing with just those notes, and after that the 4th. This helps you to hear which are the safe notes, and how to resolve a phrase, but also how you dont need a lot of notes to play, as long as your phrasing is good, interesting and has feeling.

That works too.
#21
Quote by Poisonouspot
Hey, Im kinda stuck in a rut, is there any way i can practice to improve my gutair soloing, any exercises or anything? Thanks


It's really hard to know what advice to give without knowing what sort of run you're stuck in. Very very good players can get stuck in ruts, and I'd recommend different things to them than to beginner/intermediates.

If your ear isn't very good, that's the best place to start. Perhaps your rut is about muscle memory - you're not really playing your solos with your brain, your fingers are doing the thinkign for you. This is a common beginner/intermediate rut, because so many players of that skill level neglect their ears.

But I have no way of knowing if that applies to you given what you've told us about your level.