#1
Alright... I used to play primarily second man guitar, not lead; and I recently just got into lead... and have started learning the scales and what not, and I want to learn to solo, yet I play in DROP D most of the time; I am unsure of how the scales translate from Standard E to Drop D, and how I can solo... I don't understand how to put the notes together to solo.. I don't understand what notes go well together to create a solo.
So... I want to know what notes go together well to make a solo, and how the notes transfer into Drop D tuning.
Any and All help is much appreciated.
#2
Drop D and E Standard are the same except the 6th (lowest) string is tuned down a whole step, from E to D. The other five strings are exactly the same. In terms of playing lead this shouldn't effect you much if at all. Very few people use the 6th string when soloing and even if you did want to use the 6th string in a solo all you have to do to translate E Standard to Drop D is shift the 6th string along by 2 frets. So if you were trying to play something that used the 5th fret of the 6th string in E Standard, in Drop D you'd play on the 7th fret of the 6th string instead. Everything on the 5th, 4th, 3rd, 2nd and 1st strings remains exactly the same.

As for how to construct solos, best way to learn is to listen to your favourite guitar players very carefully. People underestimate how much you can improve simply by paying attention and using your ears. If you only stick to scales then what you end up doing is just going around those scales over and over and you'll never play anything interesting. So the best thing to do is to listen to other players and try and work out what they're playing by using your ears, not by using tabs and scales. Learning scales is an okay starting point and useful for writing riffs but for real lead playing you gotta listen and experiment for yourself.
#4
Grohl pretty much nailed it.

Edit: and its called rhythm guitar not second main dude
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Last edited by Robbgnarly at Jan 1, 2012,
#5
I primarily use Dropped D as well. I just root my scales on the A string. That way, a the root note isn't a big jump like it would be on the low D. If I need notes on the low D, I know that they are the same as the other D. Essentially, learn the scales on 5 strings.
#6
Quote by NemX162
I primarily use Dropped D as well. I just root my scales on the A string. That way, a the root note isn't a big jump like it would be on the low D. If I need notes on the low D, I know that they are the same as the other D. Essentially, learn the scales on 5 strings.

This very very much. This is pretty much how I imagine it. Works for me.

Lets say you gotta solo in the key of D minor (or just anything). Just to get you started with one position, go to the D from your A string (that would be the 5th fret, although everyone knew that already). Then simply play the minor scale starting from there. If you don't know it, learn it. Starting from A string, fret 5, play 2 octaves of D minor up and down. Thats a start.

After that youd want to start learning other positions. Thats just how I first look at it. When given any key (and you know the intervals) you know how to play 2 octaves fluently with all strings exept the low D.


Now as I look at it, I explained the matter terribly. I hope someone got what I meant. If you want a TD;LR or what I mean, just look at the guy who I quoted. +1 to him.

-Jonathan
#7
Quote by Robbgnarly
Grohl pretty much nailed it.

Edit: and its called rhythm guitar not second main dude


Sorry I didn't use the perfect terminology, I know that hindered your ability in deciphering what my question was, and in giving me an answer.