#1
Hey guys, thought I'd make a thread since nobody's checked the Wiring thread in over a day.

I had the pickguard off of my '64 Gibson Melody Maker to check the output of the pickups, and I accidentally gave it a little knock...and broke the bridge ground wire...inside the hole. At first I freaked out a bit, then I put the pickguard back on and plugged her in...

A barely noticeable increase in hum, but something else I didn't expect...the tone of the pickups changed. More open, more raw. A little more treble response too.

Can anybody tell me if there are any long-term negatives to leaving the bridge ground disconnected? And does anybody have a clue why disconnecting that one wire has so drastically changed the tone of my pickups?

-RS93
Acoustics:
1994 Seagull SM6
2007 Takamine G5013SVFT

Electrics:
2008 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain Top (Cherryburst)
1964 Gibson Melody Maker D (DC)

Amps:
Traynor YGL-1

Pedals
MXR Distortion III (C4 Modded)
#2
The only downfall is electrocution.

JK.

Doesn't seem that much different from using a Dean Markely pup in the sound hole of an accoustic. No ground to the strings there.

But then again, I know just enough to know there's so much more I don't know about this topic...
#4
In fact the chance of electrocution would be virtually Zero, since the bridge and strings are no-longer part of the circuit. I may just try disconnecting the ground on my other guitars to see what i get (not going to Break them, just disconnect them)
Acoustics:
1994 Seagull SM6
2007 Takamine G5013SVFT

Electrics:
2008 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain Top (Cherryburst)
1964 Gibson Melody Maker D (DC)

Amps:
Traynor YGL-1

Pedals
MXR Distortion III (C4 Modded)
#6
Quote by PSimonR
How might this happen? If the strings are isolated then there is no chance of electricution from them.


Exactly what I was thinking. If the only downfall is a barely-noticeable increase in hum, and the benefit is electrical isolation...
Acoustics:
1994 Seagull SM6
2007 Takamine G5013SVFT

Electrics:
2008 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain Top (Cherryburst)
1964 Gibson Melody Maker D (DC)

Amps:
Traynor YGL-1

Pedals
MXR Distortion III (C4 Modded)
#8
I don't think i'll be playing my 1964 Gibson Melody Maker in the rain. The lacquer's worn completely through in some places, and old wood+water is never good.
Acoustics:
1994 Seagull SM6
2007 Takamine G5013SVFT

Electrics:
2008 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain Top (Cherryburst)
1964 Gibson Melody Maker D (DC)

Amps:
Traynor YGL-1

Pedals
MXR Distortion III (C4 Modded)
#9
JK = just kidding.

Because actually, it would be removing the parts you touch from the circuit.

But people have been fatally electrocuted by guitars before without playing them in the rain. Including some famous musicians. In 1972, Leslie Harvey of Stone the Crows died after being electrocuted on stage in England. In 1976, Keith Relf, who used to play for The Yardbirds, was electrocuted by his guitar while playing in his basement.

It's important to make sure the outlets you plug your amp and/or effects into are wired right.

http://www.amazon.com/50542-Receptacle-Tester-Improper-Indicator/dp/B002LZTKIA%3FSubscriptionId%3D15HRV3AZSMPK0GXTY102%26tag%3Die8suggestion-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3DB002LZTKIA
#10
Quote by SLEESTAK_BRO
You'll be fine as long as you don't play in the rain.

Usually a good idea not to do that. The removal of the ground should not change your tone. It is possible that this is a placebo. And did you change amp settings, amp, or effects?
Quote by Most_Triumphant
Depends, I don't know what pickups go good with plywood. EMGs will make it sound like every other EMG guitar though.

Quote by JazzMunkeyy
it needs a silver flakes
and sara underwood
Last edited by y2k11hmmm? at Jan 2, 2012,
#11
JK = just kidding.
... In 1972, Leslie Harvey of Stone the Crows died after being electrocuted on stage in England. ...QUOTE]

Wiki says it was by a microphone.
#12
Quote by y2k11hmmm?
Usually a good idea not to do that. The removal of the ground should not change your tone. It is possible that this is a placebo. And did you change amp settings, amp, or effects?


This.

If you're hearing a noticeable difference in your tone, it's not cause the bridge ground is disconnected. All it does is ensure the bridge and strings are tied to ground potential.

It's either a placebo or you need to look elsewhere.
Last edited by Phoenix V at Jan 2, 2012,
#13
Thanks guys...I think I know what happened. I didn't change any settings, but when I plugged it in for the first time, I didn't put any pedals in the chain. A 20' cable run compared to a 40' cable run will definitely have less signal degradation...thanks for all the help.
Acoustics:
1994 Seagull SM6
2007 Takamine G5013SVFT

Electrics:
2008 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain Top (Cherryburst)
1964 Gibson Melody Maker D (DC)

Amps:
Traynor YGL-1

Pedals
MXR Distortion III (C4 Modded)
#14
Quote by jetwash69
JK = just kidding.
... In 1972, Leslie Harvey of Stone the Crows died after being electrocuted on stage in England. ...QUOTE]

Wiki says it was by a microphone.


Thanks for the clarification. I'm sure the wiki is right; I just assumed that both were killed by their guitars by the way the paragraph I cut and pasted from was constructed.

Cheers.