#1
Well not shred, but play fast at all, i can't write fast licks or anything it just sounds pretty bad, is there anyway i can improve with this? thanks!
#2
Practice with a metronome.
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#3
metronome your ass off from 5bpm and move up slowly, the same as everyone else.
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#4
Start slowly and then when you feel comfortable you can play the lick accurately speed up
#6
Quote by Hail
metronome your ass off from 5bpm and move up slowly, the same as everyone else.


5bpm!? hell, that's less than a bleep every ten seconds o.O
It's more reasonable to start at like 50 :P
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#7
Quote by prevenge178

It's more reasonable to start at like 50 :P

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#9
Quote by Riffman15
Well perhaps you are trying to write overly complex licks. Fast passages tend to be simple smaller scalar patterns repeated over and over across the fingerboard. Try simplifying your licks. Also, if you can't alternate pick every not well, try legato, or mixing the two.


"Maybe you're writing things that are too hard. Try making it easier and use an easier technique to fake through it and compromise the sound of the piece."

don't listen to him, learn to play correctly and technically sound.
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#10
Quote by Hail
"Maybe you're writing things that are too hard. Try making it easier and use an easier technique to fake through it and compromise the sound of the piece."

don't listen to him, learn to play correctly and technically sound.


Hey there is nothing wrong with legato! It's a good technique for "smoother" or "flowing" passages. I agree with the aspect of learning to be technically sound first with Alternate Picking and etc., but if the TS likes legato there more don't down him for it. It may be easier to some but I have found player's that think legato is harder then just picking.
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#11
Quote by Xter
Hey there is nothing wrong with legato! It's a good technique for "smoother" or "flowing" passages. I agree with the aspect of learning to be technically sound first with Alternate Picking and etc., but if the TS likes legato there more don't down him for it. It may be easier to some but I have found player's that think legato is harder then just picking.


If people think legato is easy then they need to start learning some satch or holdsworth songs. Playing legato like that requires AMAZING muting technique and finger strength/independance.
#12
Practice techniques like legatos, pull offs, hammerons, maybe tremolo and sweep picking when you want to get really fast.

As for learning to improve speed, just practice a lot. (It takes time.)
#13
Try and walk before you run. Start at a slow tempo and work your way up.
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#14
Quote by mrbabo91
If people think legato is easy then they need to start learning some satch or holdsworth songs. Playing legato like that requires AMAZING muting technique and finger strength/independance.


Think on a beginner level. If you're playing legato because of hand synchronization issues - purely to play faster easier - it's poor habit. If he can't alt pick correctly, he's not playing holdsworthian licks, i'm guessing
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#15
I would suggest learning how to play scales. The blues or pentatonic scales are the best ones to learn first. It'll be a little boring at first, but if you learn all the notes in the scale, learning songs will be a snap because you already know how and where to play, the only difference from playing scales being that the notes will be in a different rhythm and order. When you practice the scales, you basically get a two-in-one package. You can practice both your picking and your scale knowledge.

I bet people will criticize me for bringing up the whole scales drilling thing, but to be honest, after I learned the major and blues scales all over the neck and got alternate picking down (sorta), my speed and comfort in playing increased significantly. :/

That's just how I got faster. I'm no shredder, but I'm not anywhere near as slow as I was before.
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#16
what i did to improve my speed is first of all make sure you have very good alternate picking , that's a must have. So what i did to build that speed up is a pattern i learnt over the pentatonic scale:

A Pentatonic for example
-----------------------------------------------------------5----5-8---------------------
-------------------------------------------5----5-8-5-8----8-------------------------------
---------------------------5----5-7-5-7----7-----------------------------------------------
-----------5----5-7-5-7----7---------------------------------------------------------------
---8-5-8----8----------------------------------------------------------------------------
(Accidentally missed one of the middle strings but once you figure out how the pattern works you'll get it)
If you can see what this pattern is doing , also try it in reverse , it's a handy trick and helps practice.
Another good one to practice is Every Breath You Take - The Police. Whether you like the song or not , i find it's a good on to start practicing for alternate picking.
With both of these just start slow , gradually push yourself to get faster and faster and it'll help.
Sorry if you're already above this level , just making sure the basics are covered =P
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#17
Quote by Hail
"Maybe you're writing things that are too hard. Try making it easier and use an easier technique to fake through it and compromise the sound of the piece."

don't listen to him, learn to play correctly and technically sound.


Nobody said anything about compromising the sound of the piece. It's a fact that most fast passages are simple patterns repeated over. Study the work of yngwie, gilbert, alexi laiho, to name just a few, if you don't beleive me. And the idea of mixing legato and alternate picking to increase speed is an idea advocated by John Petrucci, and Paul Gilbert.

Everyone knows the "slow with a metronome" advice. When you get past beginner level, you will see the wisdom in my suggestions.
Last edited by Riffman15 at Jan 4, 2012,
#18
Why the hell does everybody come here wanting to play fast You want the best tip? Learn what speed is comfortable. Play at it a bit. Then raise the metronome by a maximum of 10. Play again till comfy. If you make a mistake - back by 10.
#19
Quote by Hail
"Maybe you're writing things that are too hard. Try making it easier and use an easier technique to fake through it and compromise the sound of the piece."

don't listen to him, learn to play correctly and technically sound.


On the other hand, if you're only capable of playing 50bpm and you write a 200bpm sweepfest, you're not going to be able to play it, are you?

While it's true that you should always try to write a little above your level, so that you can challenge yourself and improve, it's counter-productive to write music so hard you won't be able to play it for years.
#20
speed is a by-product of accuracy. focus on being clean and relaxed and speed will come with time. do most of your practice like this and then for like 10 mins, try to push yourself to where the wheels start to come off. this will help you break out of your "speed limit". dont do it too much though or you will probably develop bad habits.
#21
Quote by CarsonStevens
On the other hand, if you're only capable of playing 50bpm and you write a 200bpm sweepfest, you're not going to be able to play it, are you?

While it's true that you should always try to write a little above your level, so that you can challenge yourself and improve, it's counter-productive to write music so hard you won't be able to play it for years.


Work on something else, or work up to the music. Don't change it just because you can't play it right now, if you like the way it sounds.
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#22
Part of virtuosity is knowing your own limits as a player, as well as those of the instrument, and the more general physiological limits of the human organism.

Speed and complexity need to be balanced, such that a respectable performance is attainable at the players current level of skill.

Joe Satriani's philosophy about fast shreddy playing is that it is merely an "effect" one uses along side the more melodic lines that constitute the flesh of the song.

Of course, if you can play a technically complex, wide interval passage, with string skips all over the place, fast and clean, the more power to you.

What it comes down to once again, however, is knowing your own limits as a player. And operating in accordance with those limits, such that you can put on a masterful performance.

The guy who mentioned always striving just slightly above your current abilities is correct. A beginning player, has no business, for instance, attempting Bach's Chaconne, even if, he tries to build with a metronome.
Last edited by Riffman15 at Jan 4, 2012,
#23
Quote by Hail
Work on something else, or work up to the music. Don't change it just because you can't play it right now, if you like the way it sounds.


...and if everything you compose is too hard for you to play, you have nothing to play. "Work on something else" is a non-starter, in that regard.
#24
You get insanely fast, by being accurate and not giving a **** about speed.
The slower you play, the faster you will get in less time.
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#25
Quote by CarsonStevens
...and if everything you compose is too hard for you to play, you have nothing to play. "Work on something else" is a non-starter, in that regard.


then work up to the music

use a metronome like everyone else

unless you're playing inhuman stretches, or 220bpm 32nd notes, most everything you do can be attained by actually working at it. you should be able to play fast - it doesn't mean you have to shred all the time, but the ability to play quickly while remaining technically sound should be something you have under your belt as a "good" performer, just like an unlimited number of other technical abilities.
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