#1
it has the deluxe tuners on it...I am looking at the Kluson WaffleBacks but they are expensive. I have heard of locking tuners,...do these help hold pitch better and are there any made for a ES-335?
MARTY FRIEDMAN--"It’s a lot easier to be technical than it is stylized; it really is... But I think it’s a lot more rare to have someone who’s really got their own sound because that’s something you can’t practice."
#2
Locking tuners are typically for guitars with a Floyd Rose tremolo bridge. They 'lock' the strings at the nut so that when you use your whammy bar it's not pulling the strings out of tune. I doubt they will be what you want for your ES-335.

Not entirely sure of your budget but here are some Gibson tuners that aren't crazy expensive.

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/tuning-machine-heads-for-guitar#fT=2010:Gibson&gP=1&pS=20&v=g&sB=bS&lP=c&catId=site1LRGI

Last edited by Zeppelin Addict at Jan 2, 2012,
#3
Quote by Zeppelin Addict
Locking tuners are typically for guitars with a Floyd Rose tremolo bridge. They 'lock' the strings at the nut so that when you use your whammy bar it's not pulling the strings out of tune.


Hm-m-m. I have locking tuners on three guitars. None of them lock the strings at the nut, and none of them have a floyd rose. I always thought of them as making it easier to install new strings, rather than locking the string in tune.
Fender American Deluxe Stratocaster
Epiphone Sheraton II, Seymour Duncan Jazz and '59.
ESP Horizon NT II
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
Mesa 5:50 Express
Egnator Rebel 30
Hughes and Kettner Tubemeister 18
#5
Quote by Zeppelin Addict
Locking tuners are typically for guitars with a Floyd Rose tremolo bridge. They 'lock' the strings at the nut so that when you use your whammy bar it's not pulling the strings out of tune. I doubt they will be what you want for your ES-335.

Not entirely sure of your budget but here are some Gibson tuners that aren't crazy expensive.

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/tuning-machine-heads-for-guitar#fT=2010:Gibson&gP=1&pS=20&v=g&sB=bS&lP=c&catId=site1LRGI


Locking tuners don't lock at the nut.

These are the type he's looking for.

EDIT:Ninja'd
Damn it! Disable can't use disable to disable Disable's disable because disable's disable has already been disabled by Disable's disable!
#6
Budget tuners on a 335? Just save the cash and pay for the tuners that guitar deserves, bro.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#7
MARTY FRIEDMAN--"It’s a lot easier to be technical than it is stylized; it really is... But I think it’s a lot more rare to have someone who’s really got their own sound because that’s something you can’t practice."
#8
I guess I should go with the Gotoh Kluson's because there are nickel and are closer to the original tuners. Unless there is something else in locking format that someone recommends?
MARTY FRIEDMAN--"It’s a lot easier to be technical than it is stylized; it really is... But I think it’s a lot more rare to have someone who’s really got their own sound because that’s something you can’t practice."
#9
well those are the best options if you want to keep the old school kluson look. there are plently of good locking tuners though like sperzel, planet waves, gotoh makes otehr ones, etc.

yes they do. they lock onto the string and keep it more stable, and keep better pitch.

the biggest reason!?!?! they make string changing take about 2 minutes. you dont have to do all that winding. you put it in, lock it, and give it about a half turn and clip. heck some even clip the3 string for you.

my guitars dont really have tuning issues, but really, string changing sucks. locking tuners would be so easy i would almost WANT to change my strings.
#10
Thank you ikey. I can't believe replacing such a simple part would be so complicated. There are so many selections. I am having trouble conceptualizing how the string is locked. However, it seems that you thread the string through the post and then it is clamped? So that is where the actual lock happens?

It seems the majority of the tuners, Schaller, Spertzel(which seems to be a cheaper version of the Schallers) and planet waves( which seems to be a more advanced version of the Schaller tuners) use a rear thumb screw to clamp the string.

Then there are some auto locking posts that require no thumb screw. So I guess as the string is threaded through the post hole it cannot be pulled out?
The rotomatics by Grover:
As you tune, the post automatically locks the string. You'll need fewer string wraps, change strings faster, and your tremolo will have more accurate return-to-pitch.


The cheapest so far seem to be the Rotomatics by Grover and the Spertzel Trim-Lok however, the rotomatics offer 18:1 gear ratio as opposed to the 12:1 of the spertzels.
I'm guessing higher gear ratio allows for more accurate tuning? or it takes less turning of the tuner to stretch the string/change pitch?

I am least concerned about aesthetics or vintage appeal.
At first I thought the locking tuners would be wrapped/tuned first and then the locking mechanism locks the string in place. So even though the string is locked in the post, it is still able to stretch more so than say a locking nut, but less than conventional tuners?

All these tuners state "Requires 10mm (13/32")-diameter pegholes" and on the gibson forum:
It should be 10mm hole size but thats all I can really advise.

http://forum.gibson.com/index.php?/topic/54701-locking-tuners-for-es335/

So any of these tuners would work with no drilling/modifications?

EDIT: Auto locking seems like it would be superior. Couldn't the thumb screws be knocked loose?
MARTY FRIEDMAN--"It’s a lot easier to be technical than it is stylized; it really is... But I think it’s a lot more rare to have someone who’s really got their own sound because that’s something you can’t practice."
Last edited by WesM.Vaughan at Jan 3, 2012,
#11
TL;DR I guess?

Auto-locking tuners seem to be superior and less problematic than the thumb screw tuners.

Im strongly considering the Grover Rotomatics @ $62.10 with 18:1 Gear ratio
The only other auto locking tuners I see are the Gotoh ones mentioned in dark_Mass's post.
They are $85 with 15:1 Gear Ratio. The only advantage to these seem to be that they have the vintage kluson style look. Don't think it is worth the extra $23. What would you do?
MARTY FRIEDMAN--"It’s a lot easier to be technical than it is stylized; it really is... But I think it’s a lot more rare to have someone who’s really got their own sound because that’s something you can’t practice."