#1
I just bought a Jackson DXMG. Mainly playing metal and I love it. The darn licensed floyd rose is giving me heartache tho.
I've tried cleaning it and making sure all the moving parts are lubed but the bloody thing keeps coming up flat or sharp if used. I don't even use it that much to be honest.
Main problem is if I am doing a solo etc if I bend the G string (for eg) up a tone or something, this pulls the whole guitar flat and I have to push the unit back down quickly before going to the next note.
Is it possible to get fixed rigid rods or something to replace the springs so it is essentially fixed in position?

I put new strings on over a week ago and they are well stretched in. I might add the guitar is 2nd hand too. I'm assuming the knife edges aren't perfect but are there any tips to essentially disable it.
Last edited by Rmonix at Jan 2, 2012,
#2
you should be able to just block the thing with some wood against the sustain block and the wall of the guitar body so teh trem can't move

never actually done it myself but i'm sure if you google you'll find some guides on doing it
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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Et tu, br00tz?
#3
That or you could try a Tremsetter.
Acoustics:
1994 Seagull SM6
2007 Takamine G5013SVFT

Electrics:
2008 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain Top (Cherryburst)
1964 Gibson Melody Maker D (DC)

Amps:
Traynor YGL-1

Pedals
MXR Distortion III (C4 Modded)
#4
Never heard of a tremsetter. Only getting into playing again. My old charvel never did this. What about getting new bridge pots and new tremolo. What aftermarket makes are recommended rather than the jackson parts.
#6
I have a Jackson LFR on my Charvel Model 4... pretty much the only guitar I had been playing for most of 10 years... no problem with it going flat or sharp with string bends.

The G string is the PITA string for sure.

How did you string it and intonate it the last time?

Did you take all the strings off thus requiring messing with the LFR? Or did you restring one at a time?

How about bringing the strings up to pitch? Did you start at the low E and work your way up or at the high E and work your way down?

Or did you bring them all to about two notes under then gradually bring them up to pitch in a D, G, A, B, low E, high E sort of alternating order?

And yes, Dave is correct. You can "block" a LFR from moving.
#7
Blocking the trem is easier and definitely works. A tremsetter you may want to get installed by a guitar tech, since it involves drilling (very tiny holes, but it's easy to punch a hole through your guitar if you aren't careful). Both work effectively, but with the Tremsetter you still get the full functionality of your trem If you want to use it.
Acoustics:
1994 Seagull SM6
2007 Takamine G5013SVFT

Electrics:
2008 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain Top (Cherryburst)
1964 Gibson Melody Maker D (DC)

Amps:
Traynor YGL-1

Pedals
MXR Distortion III (C4 Modded)
#8
The intonation was a bit off when I got it. The higher frets 12 onwards were sharp on all strings. So I took off all the strings and then fitted the low E 1st them just brought it up so it was taught, nowhere near pitch. Did the other strings doing the same, then went back to the low E, brought it up to pitch, went onto the A did the same etc etc. Then back to the E again several times over to do all strings. Trem is sitting flat to guitar ok as well. I take it I should have done it alternating to keep the trem aligned better when tuning up?
Then once I'd stretched and retuned several times I checked the pitch of the higher frets and they were still sharp. So one string at a time I loosened off the string and the moved the sliding thing back a bit, retighten, tune up all strings again and check pitch. Then did the next string. Again I probably should have alternated them is this right?
#11
Tremol-no will do what you want. Tremsetters are iffy. I've installed and configured quite a few of them (several different kinds) and had profession techs set them up as well. None of them have ever really worked as advertised. There might be a little improvement but I still have tuning issues. Tri-flo superior dry lubricant has done more good for me. By applying it to the saddles and posts my tuning stays much better. Tremsetters also don't allow the full functionality of the tremolo. You'll have more of a limit on how far you can dive or pull up depending on the type you get. A Hipshot will limit you both directions. A Black Box will limit the pull up range but allow for full diving.
Last edited by poppameth at Jan 3, 2012,
#12
Time to start saving for the ultimate titanium floyd rose. Its only £600
A metal band?
Gear:
A Guitar with an LFR > Korg Pitchblack > Behringer EQ > Hardwire CM-2 Overdrive Boss SD-1 > Hardwire CR-7 Chorus>
Orange Tiny Terror >
LzR Engineering 212 cab

My other amp can run Crysis
#13
The springs could need to be replaced or more spring tension needs to be added.
#14
Quote by FischmungaXTR
Time to start saving for the ultimate titanium floyd rose. Its only £600


What a gimmick that is! Way more money for a weaker (but lighter) material!