#1
I'm going to buy my first electric guitar; a Fender Squier Bullet. I'm mainly going to play pop / rock / top40. NO metal etc.

There are 2 versions; 1 with HSS and 1 with SSS.

FYI:
HSS means you have a humbucker in the bridge position and then a single coil in the middle and neck position

SSS is just three single coils


They both have the same price.
Which one should I get / which one is the best for my type of music?
#2
Honestly, If I was recommending this to one of my non-metalhead friends, I would suggest the HSS. It's just more versatile in general.
Acoustics:
1994 Seagull SM6
2007 Takamine G5013SVFT

Electrics:
2008 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain Top (Cherryburst)
1964 Gibson Melody Maker D (DC)

Amps:
Traynor YGL-1

Pedals
MXR Distortion III (C4 Modded)
#3
HSS for rock. When you want that biting tone you can switch the pickup to the humbucker and for strumming use the single coils.
#6
Get whatever sounds better to you.

While the humbucker helps a bit with the rock stuff, it kills 2 other tones, which are the bridge position alone (for country, surf, ... ) and the bridge + middle (strumming, funk, ... ).
On the HSS the bridge + middle usually works with a split humbucker, but it will not sound as good as on the SSS.
Fender American Special HSS Stratocaster
Ibanez 1987 Roadstar II Deluxe
Yamaha THR10X
Marshall JCM900 SL-X
Ibanez WD-7 Weeping Demon Wah
TC Electronic Polytune
Seymour Duncan Tweakfuzz
#7
Quote by JesusCrisp
Get whatever sounds better to you.

While the humbucker helps a bit with the rock stuff, it kills 2 other tones, which are the bridge position alone (for country, surf, ... ) and the bridge + middle (strumming, funk, ... ).
On the HSS the bridge + middle usually works with a split humbucker, but it will not sound as good as on the SSS.


True.

Although, Surf uses much more than just the Bridge position. Surf Guitarists changed pickup positions during songs just like everyone else. In fact, The middle position was much more popular in studios than the bridge because you'd lose a lot of high-end during recording and the not-as-bright middle position stayed more defined through the speakers of the day. The bridge position was used more during live performances, and you can hear how undefined the lead guitar is on live recordings even today.

EDIT: When I say speakers, I don't mean amp speakers, but record player speakers.
Actually, I go by Dave, but there are already too many Daves on this forum.


Fender MIM Stratocaster
Fender Jaguar Bass
Epiphone EJ200 Super Jumbo
Fender Excelsior 13w
Acoustic B300HD (with matching 1x12 cab)
BOSS BD-2W
NYC Big Muff Pi
Last edited by kangaxxter at Jan 3, 2012,
#9
okay cool! Thanks for your replies. Then, I'm also looking for an amp. It's just for in my bedroom, and I'll record it putting my studio mic in front of the amp. So I guess a 10 - 15W amp will be good enough. Any recommendations for amps?
#10
Quote by The Known
okay cool! Thanks for your replies. Then, I'm also looking for an amp. It's just for in my bedroom, and I'll record it putting my studio mic in front of the amp. So I guess a 10 - 15W amp will be good enough. Any recommendations for amps?

Yeah if you're getting a tube amp, 10-15 watts is probably overkill at bedroom levels believe it or not. Tube amps have to be cranked to sound their best.

Even people who own 5 watt amps can't often play them loud enough.

With a solid state, 10-15 watts is a solid choice for a bedroom.

Personally, I'd recommend a good multi effects unit over an actual amp for the purpose of bedroom playing and recording.
#11
Quote by Jyrgen
Yeah if you're getting a tube amp, 10-15 watts is probably overkill at bedroom levels believe it or not. Tube amps have to be cranked to sound their best.

Even people who own 5 watt amps can't often play them loud enough.

With a solid state, 10-15 watts is a solid choice for a bedroom.

Personally, I'd recommend a good multi effects unit over an actual amp for the purpose of bedroom playing and recording.

Can you specify this? What do you mean with a 'multi effects unit'. And indeed, I'm basically going to record stuff (~studio quality). And its just for in my bedroom :P

And for an amp, I was looking for a cheap one, so not a tube amp (they are too expensive). So just a solid one.
#12
What is your exact budget?

MFX units are products like Vox Tonelab pedals or Line 6 Pods. They are basically processors that contain modelling of many guitar amps and effects and can be used for a variety of purposes. They're very suitable for bedroom playing if you have headphones or good speakers.

Read the sticky threads in this forum and use Google for more information!
#13
Quote by Jyrgen
What is your exact budget?

MFX units are products like Vox Tonelab pedals or Line 6 Pods. They are basically processors that contain modelling of many guitar amps and effects and can be used for a variety of purposes. They're very suitable for bedroom playing if you have headphones or good speakers.

Read the sticky threads in this forum and use Google for more information!


Ah, cool! So that means I can just hook up my speakers/headphones with these products? That would be cool. And how to record then? Through a jack? Because most people recommend recording a guitar by putting a mic in front of the amp, instead of recording through a line jack...

My budget for a processor/amp is ~$110
#14
Quote by The Known
Ah, cool! So that means I can just hook up my speakers/headphones with these products? That would be cool. And how to record then? Through a jack? Because most people recommend recording a guitar by putting a mic in front of the amp, instead of recording through a line jack...

A line jack, or even just through USB which is a common feature in these things

I'm guessing you already have decent speakers or headphones since you're working in a studio environment. Multi effects pedals don't have any built in speakers, so you have to connect them to something to hear your playing

Quote by The Known
My budget for a processor/amp is ~$110

Perhaps MFX pedals are out of question then, unless you can find one used. I would maybe go with a tiny modelling amp like a Vox DA5 or something.
#15
Hmm. About the VOX Tonelab ST:

I think I'm going to buy a bass guitar as well (in the future). If I use normal guitar amps, I need an amp for my electric guitar, and a different amp for the bass guitar. Now my question:
Will this VOX Tonelab also work with a bass guitar?

And btw, I see it has USB. Is it also possible to record midi with it (dont think so, right)?


EDIT: btw, the VOX Tonelab has a tube in it. I heard that tube amps are very sensitive and sometimes need replacing after a couple of years. Hows that with the VOX Tonelab?
Last edited by The Known at Jan 3, 2012,
#16
Quote by The Known
Hmm. About the VOX Tonelab ST:

I think I'm going to buy a bass guitar as well (in the future). If I use normal guitar amps, I need an amp for my electric guitar, and a different amp for the bass guitar. Now my question:
Will this VOX Tonelab also work with a bass guitar?

And btw, I see it has USB. Is it also possible to record midi with it (dont think so, right)?

No you can't do do bass or midi with it.

I know that a Line 6 Pod X3 does guitar, bass and vocals. No idea about midi.

Quote by The Known

EDIT: btw, the VOX Tonelab has a tube in it. I heard that tube amps are very sensitive and sometimes need replacing after a couple of years. Hows that with the VOX Tonelab?

The tube in the Tonelab (and all Vox modellers) is a marketing gimmick, doesn't do much for the tone or probably need to be changed ever.