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#1
Hello everyone. I'm doing a project in my AP Statistics class on the correlation between pitch identification ability and years of music study/training. Basically, I'd like to gather as much data as possible from UG, so responses are appreciated.

1) Go to: http://www.good-ear.com/servlet/EarTrainer

2) On the left, click 'chromatic notes'.

3) Adjust the options on the right as you see fit.

4) Go through twenty (20) tests. After each guess, remember to click 'try next one' and not 'try again'.

5) Report your results out of twenty (20) and your years of music study/training. For the sake of a relative standard, please only list years of study involving active self-teaching, lessons from a teacher, study in school, and music theory study.

Please do not use an instrument or pitch pipe to aid you in note identification. Use only your ear and your head ^_^

Participation is voluntary and data will be analyzed anonymously. That is, no names or forum names will be listed or present in the final report. Thank you all in advance, and I hope the new year is going well for you and continues to go well.
You might could use some double modals.
#2
Wow... when selecting 'chromatic notes' I swear it turns impossible.
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#3
i got 8 out of 20

first was mostly guessing, once i finally got one right, the rest was just knowing intervals.

i didnt select the "show correct" btw, if i would have, 19 of 20 would have been rather easy.
Last edited by Ih5g at Jan 2, 2012,
#4
fix the instructions dog, "chromatic notes" doesn't show up until you click "perfect pitch". i got 20/20, been studying theory around 3 years i guess
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#5
wtf is fi
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#6
I can't do this at all

Wow.
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#8
3/20

3 months of high school jazz band.
Last edited by Fullmetalzawa at Jan 2, 2012,
#9
I was abysmal at this
8/20
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#10
6/20
Never been formally trained, done maybe about 6 months worth of self study into theory though. mainly just guessing though
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#11
19/20.

Gahhhh I am so pissed for not getting 20

chedit:
Quote by AETHERA
5) Report your results out of twenty (20) and your years of music study/training. For the sake of a relative standard, please only list years of study involving active self-teaching, lessons from a teacher, study in school, and music theory study.

Completely missed this um I haven't received a lot of music training. My mother taught me music as a child and I have had about 2 years of music at school but that was mostly pissing around doing band practice every day. So don't count that.
Last edited by chaoticfables at Jan 2, 2012,
#12
3 out of 20. Only got the first one correct because of luck, and the next 2 correct answers were because they played exactly the same pitch and I remembered. Oh God

Honestly no idea what you're asking for us to list regarding music study, so I'll just take a shot.

1) 1 year of guitar lesson (with little to no music theory involved)
2) Currently in my 10th month of piano lessons (with moderate-little to little music theory involved)
3) About 1 or 2 weeks of active self-teaching of music theory, but no practice ("highest" level is chord construction; also dabbled in a bit of modal chord progressions)
4) 5 year of playing guitar, but with little music theory involved
#13
Come on guys; the only way you can get 20/20 and 19/20 is literally having perfect pitch. Even years of ear training wouldn't let you get such a perfect score.
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#14
Quote by Svennz
Come on guys; the only way you can get 20/20 and 19/20 is literally having perfect pitch. Even years of ear training wouldn't let you get such a perfect score.

Or by correctly guessing...

As for me, 3/20, and that was all guess work.

I've been studying music theory on and off by myself for the past year, and that's it.
#16
I got 6/10. The first one was a G and I got it right and I'm pretty sure it's only because it's an open string and it's hard to avoid hearing it if you want to keep your guitar in tune. After than I used it as a reference (in my mind, mind you) to get the next two. Though I was killing it. After that I'm pretty sure the ones I got right were mostly guesses.

I've played guitar for 7 years. 3 years of one on one lessons, 5 years of school-based musical education (at the same time as my private lessons.) I haven't had a lesson in 2 years.

Quote by chaoticfables
19/20.


Quote by nutinpwnsgibson
i got 20/20, been studying theory around 3 years i guess

I seriously doubt that.

I also still seriously doubt the existence of 'perfect pitch.'
#17
Quote by Svennz
Come on guys; the only way you can get 20/20 and 19/20 is literally having perfect pitch. Even years of ear training wouldn't let you get such a perfect score.

Years of ear training will get you a decent score.

20/20, 12 years of music training.
#18
Quote by amaranth_todd
Years of ear training will get you a decent score.

20/20, 12 years of music training.

People like you make me want to commit crime.
#19
The only way I can see somebody getting a perfect score is either guessing the first note right and using it and each subsequent note as a reference, or cheating on the first note and using it and each subsequent note as a reference.
#20
Quote by Butt Rayge
The only way I can see somebody getting a perfect score is either guessing the first note right and using it and each subsequent note as a reference, or cheating on the first note and using it and each subsequent note as a reference.

Or you know, so God damn lucky you make gamblers cry.

You have a 9.53674316 × 10^-27 probability of doing it.
#21
Perfect pitch is not necessary, since if you have relative pitch, you can just use the previous note to work out the interval and figure out which note it is accordingly.

20/20
13 years of training
(perfect pitch + I'm Asian)
#22
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#24
Quote by Butt Rayge
The only way I can see somebody getting a perfect score is either guessing the first note right and using it and each subsequent note as a reference, or cheating on the first note and using it and each subsequent note as a reference.

Dude
After playing an instrument most of your life, you get to know what each note sounds like. That's how I roll
Also, just because you yourself can't do something, doesn't mean it can't be done.
#25
I seriously doubt it. And I'm speaking from experience, I've had many teachers and I've known older people than you who have been playing since they were children; and they are amazing musicians, not just guitarists. It still seems impossible to get 20/20.
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#26
19/20
but after the first one I cheated and used a relative pitch, although I knew some already, purely from sounding like notes from other songs and knowing what notes they are. i.e. C# is the first piano note in starlight by muse - got C# right everytime it came up.
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#28
Quote by Butt Rayge
The only way I can see somebody getting a perfect score is either guessing the first note right and using it and each subsequent note as a reference, or cheating on the first note and using it and each subsequent note as a reference.

You can work out the first note without perfect pitch if you memorise for example what the first note of a song you enjoy sounds like, and it's name. With good relative pitch you can compare the two and go from there. That's what I did, and although it takes me a while on each note I've got 10/10 so far and could go on. 10 years of playing guitar, but I would've been able to do this years ago.

People saying its impossible are talking out their ass lol
Last edited by Sofa at Jan 3, 2012,
#29
Quote by Butt Rayge
I also still seriously doubt the existence of 'perfect pitch.'


I used to know a drummer who played no pitched instruments. You could tell him to turn his back, and hit any note and he'd be able to tell you straight away what it was, got it right nearly every time. Lucky bastard.

Sometimes was a curse though. He'd listen to some music (usually older stuff) and complain about the guitars being out of tune and things, but nobody else could hear it.
#30
Quote by Butt Rayge
I also still seriously doubt the existence of 'perfect pitch.'


It's well established that it does exist, so I'm interested in what evidence leads you to your conclusion, other than the assumption that just because you can't identify pitches, then noone else must be able to
#31
The plug in doesn't work. Anyone mind telling me which plugin is required to hear the notes?
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#33
10/20
I have studied music for 5 years.

Basically I just kinda guessed while trying to get a reference point. Once I correctly got an F I used relative pitch. For your project, I think you might get better answers if the website didn't show you if each answer was right or wrong until the end, unless you consider using relative pitch a skill you would pick up from learning music anyway.
#34
Quote by Butt Rayge
I seriously doubt that.

I also still seriously doubt the existence of 'perfect pitch.'



I've been growing up with the piano since I was like 5. Perfect pitch exists and I know other people that can do this.
#35
I'm no one to judge you or not believe you, but that picture you just uploaded can easily be faked by doing other easy exercises on the site.
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#37
Okay, well then I'm wrong.

I just haven't ever seen any evidence of it and I don't even understand how it can be possible.
#38
Quote by Butt Rayge
Okay, well then I'm wrong.

I just haven't ever seen any evidence of it and I don't even understand how it can be possible.



The people I know who have perfect pitch hear the 'colour' of the notes or just instinctively know. Alot of it has to do with their experience with music as babies and how immersed they were with it. One thing I've found common among almost all of the people I know with perfect pitch is that they were absolutely surrounded by music from birth.

There are a few who are lucky enough to just be able to recognise notes without having much musical training or immersion.
#39
The thing I don't get is how they can supposedly recognise a frequency and instantly assign a value to it, even if they've never played an instrument before.
#40
18/20

Started studying theory on my own two years ago, one semester of college theory under my belt.
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