#1
So, I've been reading up on Stevie Ray Vaughan's techniques more lately, and saw an article that talked about a lot of his tone being in his fingers. Now, I can understand that in the aspect of stuff like attack and vibrato, but do your fingers really give you a sort of trademark to your tone? Like, is there more to your fingers than just strength, attack, and vibrato?
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#2
i dont think so but strenght attack and vibrato really do alot to chnage your tone and so do how you pick and where you pick and such i can get alot of different tone by changing my technique just a little bit

its more about your playing as a whole that gets you your tone
#3
I think your technique is part of what can make your tone. I'm slightly confused though, I thought when people say: "the tone is in your fingers" and similar things, that they were referring to the players technique. So do some people actually believe that your fingers itself actually make a hearable difference? That doesn't at all sound likely IMO.
#5
Sure there is.

Question supersac? What makes up our playing 'as a whole'?

Keep in mind one's tone is comprised of a million small things that come together to make their sound so it's all very subtle, but nobody will play like SRV just like nobody will play like you, TS.

Our fingers will have different shapes, callous on our tips can be of different thickness, we can play on slightly different spots of our finger tips, the way our nerves react when our brain tells them to do something will have slight influence on how your finger moves and affect the tone subtly as well. (Not just strength, vibrato and attack but how we take our fingers off strings, move between notes, etc.)

The same can be said for how we pick. We'll hold the pick with different strengths, pick on different angles, pick from our wrist more than our fingers and vice versa amongst other things.

There is a lot more at play than an amp and a guitar. Hence why nobody will ever play like anybody else.

#6
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This! Does anyone else sound like Tony Iommi? Don't think so, that means his fingers sound unique!
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#7
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Question supersac? What makes up our playing 'as a whole'?




i meant everything your whole echnie how you hit the string how you reacct to th esound
eveyrthing about how you handle a guitar can affect your tone
#8
Quote by supersac
i meant everything your whole echnie how you hit the string how you reacct to th esound
eveyrthing about how you handle a guitar can affect your tone


Ok cool, just wondering haha, your first post was too general for me..
I'd definitely agree though!

#9
Brass fingers are brighter, wooden fingers give a warmer tone but the amount of sustain may vary depending on the type of wood

Duh...

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#10
Quote by henrihell
^
This! Does anyone else sound like Tony Iommi? Don't think so, that means his fingers sound unique!


Actually Tony Iommi is missing the tips of some of his fingers and remedies the problem by wearing thimbles, in that way he's probably got the most copiable tone around :-P
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#11
it's probably technique as a whole. line 100 guitarists up from Al Di Meola to Petrucci and conduct a blind experiment (let them play the same scale, same guitar, same amp, pick etc); the result would probably show no significance.
#12
Pure tone is... mostly not in your fingers. How does that work? It doesn't; distortion or EQ or effects aren't in your fingers. However, what is is your technique. Your technique determines your dynamics. If you play closer to the middle of the string, you enhance your bass frequencies and have far fewer overtones, and vice versa. The harder you play, the more volume there'll be, and that may affect distortion and effects.

Technique affects tone to a certain extent. I think what you read was just 'tone' being incorrectly applied to 'sound'.
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#13
Your hands are where everything starts, the way you fret and strike the string is going to determine certain qualities of the sound that comes out of the speaker - get that starting point wrong and there'll always be something lacking in the finished product no matter how much you throw inbetween the guitar and the speaker.

That's why practicng clean or even unplugged is vital, because it teaches you how to really work for a note - play with too much gain or effects and it's easy to get a sound out with sloppy, half-arsed technique.
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#14
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That's why practicng clean or even unplugged is vital, because it teaches you how to really work for a note - play with too much gain or effects and it's easy to get a sound out with sloppy, half-arsed technique.

True. When I'm just practicing I'm usually in my bedroom or the living room just with my guitar and laptop.
When I play with gain I do change my attack for certain sounds, but I know how to get a good basic attack and everything unplugged. Everything after that is just support for that technique to get me where I need to be.
But you need to start with the technique, and it needs to be good.
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#15
Quote by Bluesblitz
So, I've been reading up on Stevie Ray Vaughan's techniques more lately, and saw an article that talked about a lot of his tone being in his fingers. Now, I can understand that in the aspect of stuff like attack and vibrato, but do your fingers really give you a sort of trademark to your tone? Like, is there more to your fingers than just strength, attack, and vibrato?

no, there isnt. and if there was it wouldnt matter because a guitar uses frets and you play behind them so it acts as a breaking point. when they say tone is in the fingers, they just mean that how a person plays affects the tone a lot. it has to do with your style of phrasing, how you pick, how you bend and do vibrato, how hard or light you pick/fret, etc...