#1
I was thinking this came with age, but after research, I don't think my assumption is right. I got a Fender CD-60 http://www.musiciansfriend.com/guitars/fender-cd-60-dreadnought-acoustic-guitar/h70152 for Christmas, and don't get me wrong I love it, the strings just feel a little tight for my liking. Not the most expensive guitar in the world, but it's backed with a good brand name, and almost perfect reviews anywhere you look. The sound is crisp and clean, i just want the strings easier to push down on. I have a old acoustic in the closet, and the strings press with almost no tension at all, and I really like that, it doesn't sound even close to as good as my new guitar though.
I have stock strings on it, and havent done anything to it except tune from standard to drop d a few times, and i used a real tuner, so its not tuned wrong, It came with some alan wrenches and stuff... maybe i gotta turn some stuff?

Sorry for the wall of text, too

Thanks!
Last edited by austinblair at Jan 3, 2012,
#2
You have to adjust the neck. It should be right in the soundhold where the fretboard ends. I don't know which way to turn it or anything like that. So don't try it yourself if you don't know what you're doing. I'd suggest taking it to a local guitar shop and telling them you need the strings lowered. Shouldn't take em more than 5 mins.
#3
try getting different strings
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#4
The strings are probably of a big gauge, just get some light strings.
You can get Bronze strings or Nickel Wound strings (Electric Guitar strings), Bronze will sound a bit mellower, but it's harder to play, while Nickel will sound brighter but it will be easier to play.
I suggest Nickel, you might have to adjust the Tross Rod to fit in Nickel strings ( you can do this at your local music store), but it will be worth it in the end.
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#5
while lighter strings would probably help, most likely you need to have your guitar set up. i have almost every guitar set up to make it easier to play. it makes quite a difference. but you might want to check your neck relief just in case you do need a truss rod adjustment. http://www.frets.com/fretspages/luthier/Technique/Setup/BuzzDiagnosis/Relief/relief.html
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#6
Quote by austinblair
The sound is crisp and clean, i just want the strings easier to push down on. I have a old acoustic in the closet, and the strings press with almost no tension at all, and I really like that, it doesn't sound even close to as good as my new guitar though.
I have stock strings on it, and havent done anything to it except tune from standard to drop d a few times, and i used a real tuner, so its not tuned wrong, It came with some alan wrenches and stuff... maybe i gotta turn some stuff?


OK, I just bought a Fender "Sonoran", which is shipped with 80/20 acoustic "Light Gauge" (.012 -.053) strings. I doubt the stings are any different on your guitar.

Mine came with a set up tag attached, giving the string height measurements. See if yours has a small tag attached as well. Post those specs, (if you find them), in this thread.

My suggestion is to NOT, "just turn something", until we can get a reference as to the actual action height and neck relief measurements are, and also until you fully understand what they should be.

Being really lazy person, I like to use a capo that only covers strings 1 through 5, put it on the second fret, and play in "drop E""......
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 4, 2012,
#7
As Patti says. Do NOT go tweaking the truss rod. It's common for new guitars, especially cheaper ones, to be shipped with the action rather high.
Have it set up by a competent tech and you'll be amazed at the difference.