#1
I have a lovely Schecter with the standard SD humbuckers in there that are coil split if you pull the tone knob out. I don't mind the pick ups and for stocks they are wonderful for all uses. I also like DiMarzio pick ups over the Duncans. How hard is it to have a new pick up installed when it has a coil split on there?
#2
For a shop, very easy.
For someone whos never done it, still pretty easy if you can read the diagram.
Theres wiring diagrams everywhere and lots of ppl here to help.
#3
yeah, i changed the pups in my new guitar over xmas which has a coil tap. i'd never done a coil tap before and it was straight forward with the use of the diagram from the seymour duncan website..... and basically taking my time, making sure not to rush...

Chapman ML2 x 2
Dean Razorback Slime Bumblebee
Gibson Les Paul Studio
Epi Les Paul Custom (EMG 81/85)
ESP Ltd EC-256 (SH4jb/SH2n)
Jackson DKMG (EMG 81/60)
Epi SG Iommi
Squier Classic Vibes 50's Tele
Ovation MT-37
Peavey 6505+ 112
#4
As long as you're getting 4 conductor humbuckers (which I'm assuming you are), the shop should have no problem.
Acoustics:
1994 Seagull SM6
2007 Takamine G5013SVFT

Electrics:
2008 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain Top (Cherryburst)
1964 Gibson Melody Maker D (DC)

Amps:
Traynor YGL-1

Pedals
MXR Distortion III (C4 Modded)
#5
It only involves a couple more solder joints. You just need to make sure that the new pickup is 4 conductor, as the chap above said.
#6
Quote by Confuse-a-Cat
It only involves a couple more solder joints. You just need to make sure that the new pickup is 4 conductor, as the chap above said.


Although IF necessary, it Is possible to make a regular 2-conductor HB into a 4-conductor
Acoustics:
1994 Seagull SM6
2007 Takamine G5013SVFT

Electrics:
2008 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain Top (Cherryburst)
1964 Gibson Melody Maker D (DC)

Amps:
Traynor YGL-1

Pedals
MXR Distortion III (C4 Modded)
#7
Okay good to know, as much as I love the Duncans I would rather have a different set in there and am thinking about having them swapped. It would cost way too much for me to do it, so I would pay to have someone else do it, also probably them knowing what they are doing the better. I know its fairly simple its just better that I pay someone else. I don't trust me with electronic assemblies. Plus with the added complexity of it being split makes it more worthwhile.
#8
It would not cost way too much for you to do it.
My soldering iron kit cost 12$ at radio shack.
Also its 4 wires out, 4 wires in.
But if u dont feel comfortable, leave it to a pro.
#9
DiMarzio in series .red is hot,green&bare to ground, white&black together on tap switch.
#10
Quote by kharn_tb
It would cost way too much for me to do it, so I would pay to have someone else do it
It will cost much more to pay someone else to do it than I would for you to do it yourself.

Plus with the added complexity of it being split makes it more worthwhile.
Having a coil split on the guitar really does not make it any more complicated. Since the guitar is already wired up, you don't even need to worry about wiring the switch to split the pickup.
Normally you put one wire from the pickup on the pickup selector or volume control, two are put together to go to ground and two are put together and taped off. With a coil split the two wires that usually get put together and taped off get soldered on to a switch instead. This switch is easy to see and work out since your guitar is already wired up to use it. Everything else is the same. That's it, that's how much more ''complicated'' it is. You're just taking one pair of wires that usually don't get soldered to anything and you solder them to one part of an already wired-up switch instead.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.