#1
So for my first guitar I purchased a Epiphone Les Paul Standard. Now I just need to find out how to play it.

Are there any specific books that you guys recommend? I could order off of Amazon or buy from a bookstore, it doesn't matter. Or should I take private lessons? What about videos?

Where would be a good place to start from scratch? I really don't know anything about playing guitar besides a few metallica riffs and like 8 chords.
#2
I suggest you use justinguitar.com all of his lessons are free and they are very good.
if you have a console such as Xbox 360 or PS3 also suggest that along with using justinguitar you try to get a copy of Rocksmith.
#3
Quote by Darkdevil725
I suggest you use justinguitar.com all of his lessons are free and they are very good.
if you have a console such as Xbox 360 or PS3 also suggest that along with using justinguitar you try to get a copy of Rocksmith.


I have a PS3 and Xbox 360 so I will most likely get that game. Does it walk you through guitar basics or how does it work?
#4
Just **** around with your guitar at first, get familiar with how the sounds are made, this may sound really stupid, but it will help you get to know what sounds can be produced. Second, why did you start playing guitar?
...
#5
Quote by Ghold125
Just **** around with your guitar at first, get familiar with how the sounds are made, this may sound really stupid, but it will help you get to know what sounds can be produced. Second, why did you start playing guitar?


Because I have lost interest in everything else in the world basically. I am a high school senior starting my second semester (high school seniors don't do ANYTHING their second semester because you have already sent your grades to colleges) so I won't be doing any school work. I used to play a ton of video games but I recently stopped playing them. I really don't have anything else to do so starting a new instrument sounded fun. I used to play Piano, drums, and the saxophone so I know quite a bit about sheet music as well.

I already know a lot about guitars. I owned a really crappy guitar that completely stopped working for 2 years and I just messed around with some metallica tabs with it. I know a lot about playing random things.

I just spent $400 on a guitar so I really want to get into playing it. I'll also be selling my Line 6 Spider IV tomorrow and picking up a Peavey Vypyr 15.
#6
Basically,

1.VDO lessons will demonstrate you what you should do and should not
2. Book lessons will literally explain you what you can play and what things are
3. Private lessons will help you to solve those problems where you may be clueless how to find some solutions.

The best is to take the combination for your learning
#7
You have to find what works for you. I like Rocksmith too but the song list is still weak. I'd look at doing some video tutorials to get you started. Learn and Master is a good one otherwise if you can stand Justinguitar then he's pretty good too.
#8
Quote by ComradeNF
I have a PS3 and Xbox 360 so I will most likely get that game. Does it walk you through guitar basics or how does it work?

Yeah it walks you through all the basics and teaches you chords, scales, basic techniques etc... If you use that and justinguitar together you will be able to learn faster than simply using one or the other by themselves.
#9
http://metalmethod.com is a great beginner’s method. It’s kind of cheesy and the melodic hair-metal themes feel dated, but Doug Marks really manages to pack a ton of learning into an inexpensive package. I got more out of the Metal Method set than I did from years of private lessons.
#10
Quote by ComradeNF
I have a PS3 and Xbox 360 so I will most likely get that game. Does it walk you through guitar basics or how does it work?


If you have both, I highly suggest you get the Xbox version. If the forums are anything to go by, the PS3 version is buggy as hell.

Lessons; yes, if you can afford them. Nothing beats a good teacher. If not, I started with two "...for Dummies" books; Guitar For Dummies and Rock Guitar For Dummies, respectively.
#11
Erm i dont know why nobody mentioned it.
Before you do anything, get your technique right from the beginning, spend some time researching about bad habits and good habits. It will save you en incredible ammount of pain and time in the future.
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#12
For books, you should check out the Troy Stetina series. I'm still working through the Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitar book, and its full of awesome goodies for the aspiring shredder. Of course, the Stetina series is geared towards guitarists interested in speed (metal) styles, but its still a great series overall.

Youtube also has a host of good lessons from various people. Find a solo/song you want to learn and see if there's a lesson available.
Axes:
2010 Carvin ST300C
1994 Jackson Soloist XL Professional
2008 "Jacksbanez"
2007 Gibson Flying V
2003 Epiphone Les Paul Plus

Amps:
Peavey 6505+ Combo
Peavey Classic 30
Peavey Vypyr 15
#14
I studied on Troy Stetina's books for Lead and Rhythm guitar (I finished the rhythm one and I'm going through the lead one), and I also found really interesting Peter Fisher "Rock Guitar Secrets".
#15
Once you get acquainted and decently familiar with the guitar, or are motivated to make some serious progress with both technique and theory, I HIGHLY recommend Guthrie Govan's Creative Guitar series of instructional books.
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Last edited by Colonel Sanders : Yesterday at 10:54 PM.
#16
Quote by ComradeNF
So for my first guitar I purchased a Epiphone Les Paul Standard. Now I just need to find out how to play it.

Are there any specific books that you guys recommend? I could order off of Amazon or buy from a bookstore, it doesn't matter. Or should I take private lessons? What about videos?

Where would be a good place to start from scratch? I really don't know anything about playing guitar besides a few metallica riffs and like 8 chords.

If you afford lessons, I think you'd progress more quickly than learning from books. You'll also have a lesser likelihood of ingraining bad technique. Not saying that it's always the case with books, but with a teacher looking at how you play your mistakes will be pointed out immediately if the teacher's good.

For now, if possible, learn how barre chords work. If you know how barre chords work, you won't be limited by the number of chords you learn.