#1
I have oportunity to be teached by jazz guitarist who went to academy of music, and I play mostly metal. So my question is can I find something good there?this guy is not just a guitarist, he is a true musician and knows his stuff, but he plays jazz player. What do you think? I've been playing little more that a year and want to check my playing ability, to see where I am right now judged by a professional.
#2
As long as he can teach you what you want to learn, it won't matter what he studied. Also it should be noted you can't study "metal" at university, usually the only choices are jazz or classical. For that reason any teacher with a music degree will be jazz or classical.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#3
Yes - you will learn an enormous amount from a jazz player. If nothing else it'll give you a new perspective on how music works, building a melody around chords and transitions rather than building chords over a riff.

Also if you've been playing a year your technique has probably built up imperfections - if he's a good guitarist he'll be able to spot it - technique is not generally unique to a style of music (and he should know at least some down picking technique) and being from a different genre of music he may actually be able to help more by forcing you to focus on different things like phrasing through picking.

How good a teacher is he though? You can know as much stuff as you like but not be a good teacher if you don't explain it in a way the other person understands.
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#4
This could be very beneficial.

Whn I studied jazz I was taught by a big fusion guy, it was not a private lesson it was in a class, and a lot of people didn't get it or didn't are for it, so he said to them 'Satriani knows all this you know'. Not the best argument in its favour but its true.

The biggest advantage of learning from a jazz guy when your more into metal is that they will help you build a massive vocabulary all over your fretboard, which will become very useful, and they will help you to get to know your guitar really well.

I'v found jazz teachers may not require so much of the technique you may want for metal, but I'm not saying they wont be able to teach it to you.
#5
Jazz and Classical guitar will help you greatly. Perfect example is the guitarist for The Human Abstract. He classically trained, and look how he writes for them.
#6
Quote by jkielq91
Whn I studied jazz I was taught by a big fusion guy, it was not a private lesson it was in a class, and a lot of people didn't get it or didn't are for it, so he said to them 'Satriani knows all this you know'.

Who was that?

TS, as a form of inspiration check out Shawn Baxter, he had an album out, aptly entitled Jazz Metal. So you can imagine what two styles that would be a fusion of! He's one of the UK's most respected teachers.
#7
meh. yeah it's worth it just for expanding your conceptions, but if you like metal you're probably more internally geared toward classical guitar.
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#8
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#12
Quote by kimi_page
I have oportunity to be teached by jazz guitarist who went to academy of music, and I play mostly metal. So my question is can I find something good there?this guy is not just a guitarist, he is a true musician and knows his stuff, but he plays jazz player. What do you think? I've been playing little more that a year and want to check my playing ability, to see where I am right now judged by a professional.


I have no doubt that a teacher will a degree in jazz will be capable of teaching you a tremendous amount.

My bigger concern is if you're going to be capable of learning it - that is to say, are you going to embrace playing music other than metal in the short term, trusting that the things you'll learn will eventually become relevant to the music you want to make?

Maybe that won't be an issue. Maybe he'll be able to translate those concepts into metal music and teach you that. But I suspect that you're going to start building a foundation with concepts that don't strike you as immediately relevant to metal, but will make you a better musician.

I suspect that will be one of the best things for you - so long as YOU can find a way to enjoy it and be motivated by it and put a lot of energy into it. But some students can't do that - they are only motivated if their teacher is feeding them stuff that obviously fits right into their narrow field of preferences.
#13
It worked for me, just don't be surprised if you find yourself staying up playing more jazz than metal. Or never playing a metal song the same way, for that matter.
#14
Quote by HotspurJr
I have no doubt that a teacher will a degree in jazz will be capable of teaching you a tremendous amount.

My bigger concern is if you're going to be capable of learning it - that is to say, are you going to embrace playing music other than metal in the short term, trusting that the things you'll learn will eventually become relevant to the music you want to make?

Maybe that won't be an issue. Maybe he'll be able to translate those concepts into metal music and teach you that. But I suspect that you're going to start building a foundation with concepts that don't strike you as immediately relevant to metal, but will make you a better musician.

I suspect that will be one of the best things for you - so long as YOU can find a way to enjoy it and be motivated by it and put a lot of energy into it. But some students can't do that - they are only motivated if their teacher is feeding them stuff that obviously fits right into their narrow field of preferences.


I think that it won't be a problem, because I love music, the art in music, no matter what genre, but I play metal, because I like metal music the most, and maybe I'll start playing jazz too. I would be one more thing that will help me in my journey, and make my sense of music better