#1
Hey all,

It's not often that i get to use my degree for 'fun' stuff. But it's slow at the office and i thought i'd give some advice.

In another thread, i saw a bass being described as vintage 1987. I thought... damn... i'm older than that and i sure as hell don't feel 'vintage'.

So, since it gets thrown around a lot, i thought i'd let yall know my thoughts on 'Vintage'.


Technically, vintage's usage is only really applicable in the context of wines. The term 'Vintage' must then be followed by a year. So, an example would be... i have a bottle of Vintage 1992 Merolt. What that means is the grapes were harvested in 1992 to make this wine.

However, THIS mode of usage is generally frowned upon when being used in other contexts, namely, its Collectibllity or Value. When it comes to non-wines, it is generally accepted that 'Vintage' refers to anything 40-99 years of age. However, some 'collectibles' groups bump up the requirements to 50-99 years old. Anything 100 years old and beyond is 'Antique'. Things are then also described by their time-period (i.e.-Victorian, Medieval, Roman). Beyond that, usually 2000+ years, the word Ancient is used.

So, when describing our basses, calling my 1995 Ibanez ATK300 Vintage, is generally frowned upon. But, as many sellers do, it's not entirely wrong so long as I would word it as a Vintage 1995 Ibanez ATK300. The main point is to have a year directly follow the word 'Vintage'. Though, flowery wording aside, even though its linguistically passable, from a collection/value standpoint... it's not REALLY a vintage instrument until it reaches that 40 year mark. So, even though that 1977 Fender Jazz bass'll net ya a quick $2000... it's not REALLY vintage, yet. This year, anything made in 1972, though, IS now vintage.


/themoreyouknow


PS - on a related note, the word 'Retro' has no time-point associated with it. It refers to style. More specifically, it refers to the usage of an older style that has come into popularity again. So, my '62 MIJ Reissue P bass is Retro... but that has nothing to do with its age.


PPS - I know there was no real reason for this, but i was bored. I thought it would at least be a more interesting read than another thread about trying to buy an entire new setup for $100.
"Punk Rock should mean freedom, liking and accepting anything that you like, as sloppy as you want, as long as it's good and has passion."
Last edited by Din of Win at Jan 4, 2012,
#2
Bravo, I had a big argument about this with some people recently. It started for me when someone on craigslist was selling a '91 beginner acoustic guitar as vintage and $200. Having been born in 1990 I found it hard to believe I was almost the concept of an antique before finishing college. The word vintage is like a backwards coupon, it's not a $150 '86 squier P bass, it's a vintage model $300.

Did you graduate? Were you majoring in accounting? Sorry to sound like a creep if I'm right, I remember like everything and sometimes I come off like a stalker.
#3
Haha, i have a Bachelors in Linguistics.

However, i work as a database designer for a CRO by day, and a martial arts instructor by night.


So, like i said... i don't often get to use my degree


Because of what i DO do, I've been thinking about getting a degree in applied statistics, and take some programming classes to become certified. It's just a bummer, as i like words more than numbers. But, numbers bring home a better paycheck, and i'm too nice and honest to go into marketing :/


Haha, i take the "vintage" thing personally, too... I was born in 1983, and seeing the "vintage 1987" made me feel old. So, making myself feel better was my main motivation behind writing this up
"Punk Rock should mean freedom, liking and accepting anything that you like, as sloppy as you want, as long as it's good and has passion."
#4
Well I guess I am the evil slick bastard lol, I'm about to go to university this spring for business marketing. Goodbye Austin hello Denton...

I have a associates in Radio TV and Film, and it would cool to do commercials. I'd really want to work in marketing and design with a company like Fender or Peavey. I really like how recently Fender is kind of breaking the mold and trying new things more aggressively than before, and Peavey just seems like a really solid company.

I also wouldn't mind working for the man and getting some sweet bailout money and living on an island with a small hairless cat.
#5
Quote by askrere


I have a associates in Radio TV and Film, and it would cool to do commercials. I'd really want to work in marketing and design with a company like Fender or Peavey. I really like how recently Fender is kind of breaking the mold and trying new things more aggressively than before, and Peavey just seems like a really solid company.


DO IT! Please! Haha, i feel like the marketing departments of them tend to be dominated by guitarists. It'd be nice to get some bassists on the inside. As for Peavey, they have such amazing potential. They just need to be OUT there more. Bringing back their custom shop would help a ton. They have such a great following of people that play their instruments from 25-30 years ago. If they applied today's tech to THAT demographic, they could really be up there with Ibanez and Yamaha in the competitive market.

I also wouldn't mind working for the man and getting some sweet bailout money and living on an island with a small hairless cat.


Some days i think that too... so, make it a fancy-ass long hair cat, and i'm right there with ya.
"Punk Rock should mean freedom, liking and accepting anything that you like, as sloppy as you want, as long as it's good and has passion."
#6
Quote by askrere
Bravo, I had a big argument about this with some people recently. It started for me when someone on craigslist was selling a '91 beginner acoustic guitar as vintage and $200. Having been born in 1990 I found it hard to believe I was almost the concept of an antique before finishing college. The word vintage is like a backwards coupon, it's not a $150 '86 squier P bass, it's a vintage model $300.


What if it was a Vintage guitar, as in the brand .

Having said that - good post.
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#8
Quote by Nutter_101
What if it was a Vintage guitar, as in the brand .

Having said that - good post.


I don't think it's the same thing, but there's a brand called vantage people around here ever so often sell on craigslist as a vintage

Edit: as for the companies yea, any guitar center is dominated by a big cardboard center piece with all the info on the latest fender guitar. Even in the adverts they'll devote pages upon pages discussing them. When it comes to bass I haven't even seen the new blacktop basses in person and I've frequented 3 guitar centers, and several other stores in the last 3 months. The only adverts on any of these new fender basses black top and the chinese fenders, have been from you guys spreading info on here.

As for Peavey, exactly what I thought. After playing with a T-60 and that Mark IV bass head it's incredible how ahead of the times they were in there designs. Mind you everything Peavey looks incredibly solid, but nothing really seems as incredibly complex and versatile as it was or looks as good (my opinion). They seem to be playing very close to the vest and safe.
Last edited by askrere at Jan 4, 2012,
#10
I would say that vintage, in terms of guitars, means old enough to be worth more rather than less. I.e. a 60s jazz is vintage whereas a 90s jazz bass is just a bit old.
#11
vintage to me is pre 1980
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate