Poll: Which book should we read for month one?
Poll Options
View poll results: Which book should we read for month one?
To Kill A Mockingbird - Harper Lee
9 13%
All the Pretty Horses - Cormac McCarthy
9 13%
Cathedral - Ray Carver
2 3%
A Clockwork Orange - Anthony Burgess
14 20%
Invitation To A Beheading - Vladimir Nabokov
4 6%
The Trial - Franz Kafka
19 27%
Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction - JD Salinger
1 1%
The Autobiography of Malcolm X - Malcolm X with Alex Haley
3 4%
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values - Robert Pirsig
7 10%
The Power of One - Bryce Courtenay
2 3%
Voters: 70.
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#1
So after the abysmal mess of our drawing from a hat attempt and people hating the idea of a book focusing on a relationship, we're trying this again.

Here are our potential choices for the first month:
To Kill A Mockingbird - Harper Lee
All the Pretty Horses - Cormac McCarthy
Cathedral - Ray Carver
A Clockwork Orange - Anthony Burgess
Invitation To A Beheading - Vladimir Nabokov
The Trial - Franz Kafka
Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction - JD Salinger
The Autobiography of Malcolm X - Malcolm X with Alex Haley
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values - Robert Pirsig
The Power of One - Bryce Courtenay
Please be careful reading over these entries because some of the wikipedia entries tend to give a lot of things away.

After three days, the poll will close and we'll move discussion to a brand new thread.

So please, vote and make it clear if you are planning on participating or not.

Participating Users
uhh_me?
Shr3dz0r
Tupu
Tanglewoodguit
blackborrego
darkstar2466
justinb904
Weaponized
genghisgandhi (if not Mockingbird or Motorcycle)
AeroRocker
dann_blood
JohnnyGenzale (if The Trial)
iro-bot31
Rancid Ivy
Cianyx
opc100
Ostinattos
dullsilver_mike
WhiskeyFace (if Kafka, McCarthy, Pirsig, or Burgess)
element4433
cornmancer (unless Mockingbird)
daytripper75
qaz923 (if Kafka)
spitonastranger
Cal UK
I.O.T.M


Possibly Next Month
Vandals572

voting unofficially closed.
#2
I voted To Kill a Mockingbird, essentially because I'm reading it for school at the moment and would love to discuss it with you people.

EDIT: Although the J.D. Salinger book and The Trial look pretty interesting as well.
"You have brains in your head,
You have feet in your shoes,
You can steer yourself,
any direction you choose,
You're on your own,
And you know what you know,
And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go."

- Dr. Seuss
Last edited by Rancid Ivy at Jan 4, 2012,
#3
Although I haven't read any of the other books in that list, I can tell you that you can't go wrong with To Kill a Mockingbird. It's an excellent book. I've also heard good things about Malcom X's biography, but I haven't read it, so I can't really tell you how good it is.
#4
You can put me down as participating
Warning: The above post may contain lethal levels of radiation, sharp objects and sexiness.
Proceed with extreme caution!
#6
Voted for The Trial Hope this turns out well and we grow into a huge club.
If I played guitar I'd be Jimmy Page, the girlies I like are underage.
#7
The Trial - Franz Kafka

I think the reread would be more entertaining than the last time I read it.
#8
The Autobiography of Malcolm X - Malcolm X with Alex Haley

and

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values - Robert Pirsig

Are two of the best books I've ever read. Highly recommend them, especially the latter.
"Why should we subsidise intellectual curiosity?"
-Ronald Reagan

"Knowledge is in every country the surest basis of public happiness."
-George Washington
#9
just a note: i made it a public poll. if you vote i'm marking you down and then subsequently harassing you about participating.
#10
I'll participate if Mockingbird or Motor Cycle Maintenance aren't picked. I have too much to read right now to be rereading stuff.
#11
Sweet. uhh_me - Stoked to have the ball rolling. Count me in.
Quote by denizenz
I'll logic you right in the thyroid.

Art & Lutherie
#12
ahh, I would totally be into this, but I just started reading The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, and I'm about to start my next semester. Perhaps I will participate in the next one.
Quote by alkalineweeman
If by "clean" you mean "get a finger right up in there and do a good bit of spelunking" then i guess "at any given opportunity" is my answer.


mah hardcore band
http://monstersvsaliens.bandcamp.com/
#13
I voted for The Trial. Since I could never get into Kafka (read The Castle and Metamorphosis and other short stories), I'm interested in what others see in him.

My vote, however, is tied with Motorcycle
#14
Quote by kratos379
Although I haven't read any of the other books in that list, I can tell you that you can't go wrong with To Kill a Mockingbird. It's an excellent book. I've also heard good things about Malcom X's biography, but I haven't read it, so I can't really tell you how good it is.

Quote by Rancid Ivy
I voted To Kill a Mockingbird, essentially because I'm reading it for school at the moment and would love to discuss it with you people.

EDIT: Although the J.D. Salinger book and The Trial look pretty interesting as well.

Quote by Ur all $h1t
The Autobiography of Malcolm X - Malcolm X with Alex Haley

and

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values - Robert Pirsig

Are two of the best books I've ever read. Highly recommend them, especially the latter.

so are y'all in? in depending on the book?
#15
I'm in!

Voted for Burgess
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█████████████████████
██████████████████████████
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LET'S GO BUCKS
#16
In. Might be a bit late in the month for reading whatever we choose though.
Quote by Vornik
Thanks for the advice. I'm going to put it, along with your other advice, into a book, the pages of which I will then use to wipe my ass.
#17
If The Trial. I'm in.
Does this mean I have to read, like, an entire book?



And also. You put Tanglewoodguit on the participating... Wouldn't that imply he can read?


lololololol
sometimes I see us in a cymbal splash or in the sound of a car crash
Last edited by JohnnyGenzale at Jan 4, 2012,
#19
Voted for A Clockwork Orange, but I'm really tied between that and The Trial.

Oh, and you can add me to the participating list.
#20
Quote by uhh_me?
so are y'all in? in depending on the book?

I'm in for sure if it's Mockingbird. If not I'll probably still be in, depending on wether or not I can find said book.

So just put me down as participating and I'll inform you guys later if I decide to drop out.
"You have brains in your head,
You have feet in your shoes,
You can steer yourself,
any direction you choose,
You're on your own,
And you know what you know,
And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go."

- Dr. Seuss
#23
Aw, goddamnit. Why did I ever propose Kafka in the other thread. This will force me to read text. Like actual text. In a book. That's so gay.
sometimes I see us in a cymbal splash or in the sound of a car crash
#27
I'm in for sure.

Added myself.
*-)
Quote by Bob_Sacamano
i kinda wish we all had a penis and vagina instead of buttholes

i mean no offense to buttholes and poop or anything

Rest in Peace, Troy Davis and Trayvon Martin and Jordan Davis and Eric Garner and Mike Brown
#28
Quote by daytripper75

I read it like 5 years ago, and I've been wanting to read it again.


Any good?
"You have brains in your head,
You have feet in your shoes,
You can steer yourself,
any direction you choose,
You're on your own,
And you know what you know,
And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go."

- Dr. Seuss
#29
Quote by Rancid Ivy
Any good?



I really enjoyed it. The chapters about the Hajj and his trip to Mecca were really eye opening.
#30
Quote by daytripper75
I really enjoyed it. The chapters about the Hajj and his trip to Mecca were really eye opening.

hmm, well I might just pick it up next time I go to a bookstore then.
"You have brains in your head,
You have feet in your shoes,
You can steer yourself,
any direction you choose,
You're on your own,
And you know what you know,
And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go."

- Dr. Seuss
#31
Quote by Rancid Ivy
Any good?

Incredible. One of my favourite passages:

Overalled rural Southern Negroes, small town Negroes, Northern ghetto Negroes, even thousands of previously Uncle Tom Negroes began talking “March!”
Nothing since Joe Louis had so coalesced the masses of Negroes. Groups of Negroes were talking of getting to Washington any way they could-in rickety old cars, on buses, hitch-hiking- walking, even, if they had to. They envisioned thousands of black brothers converging together upon Washington-to lie down in the streets, on airport runways, on government lawns-demanding of the Congress and the White House some concrete civil rights action.
This was a national bitterness; militant, unorganized, and leaderless. Predominantly, it was young Negroes, defiant of whatever might be the consequences, sick and tired of the black man's neck under the white man's heel.
The white man had plenty of good reasons for nervous worry. The right spark-some unpredictable emotional chemistry-could set off a black uprising. The government knew that thousands of milling, angry blacks not only could completely disrupt Washington-but they could erupt in Washington.
The White House speedily invited in the major civil rights Negro “leaders.” They were asked to stop the planned March. They truthfully said they hadn't begun it, they had no control over it-the idea was national, spontaneous, unorganized, and leaderless. In other words, it was a black powder keg.
Any student of how “integration” can weaken the black man's movement was about to observe a master lesson.
The White House, with a fanfare of international publicity, “approved,” “endorsed,” and “welcomed” a March on Washington. The big civil rights organizations right at this time had been publicly squabbling about donations.The _New York Times_ had broken the story. The N.A.A.C.P. had charged that other agencies' demonstrations, highly publicized, had attracted a major part of the civil rights donations-while the N.A.A.C.P. got left holding the bag, supplying costly bail and
legal talent for the other organizations' jailed demonstrators.
It was like a movie. The next scene was the “big six” civil rights Negro “leaders” meeting in New York City with the white head of a big philanthropic agency. They were told that their money- wrangling in public was damaging their image. And a reported $800,000 was donated to a United Civil Rights Leadership council that was quickly organized by the “big six.”
Now, what had instantly achieved black unity? The white man's money. What string was attached to the money? Advice. Not only was there this donation, but another comparable sum was promised, for sometime later on, after the March . . . obviously if all went well.
The original “angry” March on Washington was now about to be entirely changed.
Massive international publicity projected the “big six” as March on Washington leaders. It was news to those angry grassroots Negroes steadily adding steam to their March plans. They probably assumed that now those famous “leaders” were endorsing and joining them.
Invited next to join the March were four famous white public figures: one Catholic, one Jew, one Protestant, and one labor boss.
The massive publicity now gently hinted that the “big ten” would “supervise” the March on Washington's “mood,” and its “direction.”
The four white figures began nodding. The word spread fast among so-called “liberal” Catholics, Jews, Protestants, and laborites: it was “democratic” to join this black March.
And suddenly, the previously March-nervous whites began announcing _they_ were going.
It was as if electrical current shot through the ranks of bourgeois Negroes-the very so-called “middle-class” and “upper-class” who had earlier been deploring the March on Washington talk by grass-roots Negroes. But white people, now, were going to march. Why, some downtrodden, jobless, hungry Negro might have gotten trampled. Those “integration”-mad Negroes practically ran over each other trying to find out where to sign up. The “angry blacks” March suddenly had been made chic. Suddenly it had a Kentucky Derby image. For the status-seeker, it was a status symbol. “Were you _there_?” You can hear that right today.
It had become an outing, a picnic.
The morning of the March, any rickety carloads of angry, dusty, sweating small-town Negroes would have gotten lost among the chartered jet planes, railroad cars, and air-conditioned buses. What originally was planned to be an angry riptide, one English newspaper aptly described now as “the gentle flood.” Talk about “integrated”! It was like salt and pepper. And, by now, there wasn't a single logistics aspect uncontrolled.
The marchers had been instructed to bring no signs-signs were provided. They had been told to sing one song: “We Shall Overcome.” They had been told _how_ to arrive, _when_, _where_ to arrive, _where_ to assemble, when to _start_ marching, the _route_ to march. First-aid stations were strategically located-even where to _faint_!
Yes, I was there. I observed that circus. Who ever heard of angry revolutionists all harmonizing “We Shall Overcome . . . Suum Day . . .” while tripping and swaying along arm-in-arm with the very people they were supposed to be angrily revolting against? Who ever heard of angry revolutionists swinging their bare feet together with their oppressor in lily-pad park pools, with gospels and guitars and “I Have, A Dream” speeches?
And the black masses in America were-and still are-having a nightmare. These “angry revolutionists” even followed their final instructions: to leave early. With all of those
thousands upon thousands of “angry revolutionists,” so few stayed over that the next morning the Washington hotel association reported a costly loss in empty rooms.
Hollywood couldn't have topped it.
In a subsequent press poll, not one Congressman or Senator with a previous record of opposition to civil rights said he had changed his views. What did anyone expect? How was a one-day “integrated” picnic going to counter-influence these representatives of prejudice rooted deep in the psyche of the American white man for four hundred years?
"Why should we subsidise intellectual curiosity?"
-Ronald Reagan

"Knowledge is in every country the surest basis of public happiness."
-George Washington
#32
^^
That was actually pretty interesting. I think I'll read that before I tackle the Lord of the Rings (which I really should start, I've owned all the books + The Hobbit for over two months now).
"You have brains in your head,
You have feet in your shoes,
You can steer yourself,
any direction you choose,
You're on your own,
And you know what you know,
And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go."

- Dr. Seuss
#34
I'm in if it's the Trial, I have an independent reading project for one of my classes where it is an option. Kill two mockingbirds with one stone
#35
I'm in. If it's one i've already read i'll participate in the discussion but i doubt i'll want to re-read it. We'll see

Voted for Cormac

I've read a couple of his but not that one.
#37
i should clarify. Ill try to keep up with anything you guys do but no promises unless kafka
#38
In the next month, would it be the same set of books bar one? or would a new list be made?
#39
thoughts on that:

it could be a whole new batch or books, unless the same ones get nominated.

i would like to give some sort of priority to people who actively participate, but i'm not sure exactly how to do that.

would it be a bad idea if the top 3 non winning books from this month automatically were nominated for next month?
#40
Quote by uhh_me?


would it be a bad idea if the top 3 non winning books from this month automatically were nominated for next month?



No. That clearly shows that there is some amount of interest in them. There are some great books on that list, and it would be a shame to see them get dismissed because they had a few less votes than another.
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