#1
Which is ok. I like playing rhythm, and ive never been that great at solos anyway. But if Im gonna be the rhythm guitarist, I want to be one of the best rhythm guitarists. I dont want to be seen as the guitarist who isnt as good as the other one, i want people to recognize the rhythm as much as the leads.

So my question is this:
What/how should I practice to get really great at rhythm playing? Any bands in particular that i should listen to and try to learn their songs? I know the obvious ones such as Metallica and whatnot, but who else? Any tips and advice is greatly appreciated
#2
Genre?

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#3
Practice downpicking as much as possible and do anything you can to be creative. Also don't let the fact that you're a rhythm guitarist let you believe that you can't do anything technical or that you can't do the occasional lead.
#5
Not to start any flame wars going, but if you want to listen to good rhythm playing I recommend listening to Megadeth. Dave Mustaine plays some awesome rhythm. Testament is good too.
#6
I'd recommend Mark Tremonti's instructional DVD. Here this may interest you: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=siId0ykNui0
Originally Posted by happytimeharry
Your avatar is creepy, yet incredibly hypnotic...

I do what I can

Originally Posted by FiNNi
@AlterEdge: On a side note, I laughed when I noticed pedobear was your avatar

Me too... me too...
#7
I like megadeth quite a bit too, metallica just has more of the sound that we're going for. Never listened to testament though, ill have to look em up.

@AlterEdge that video was amazing, where can i find that dvd?

/edit
the riffs he was playing sound a bit like mine too, only better
Last edited by JablesMB at Jan 5, 2012,
#8
Rhythm is what makes a song in the first place ... The lead is making the song sound more full, unique, and flavorful. I'm a lead guitarist and i know this. I don't know if you enjoy scream o style metal but bands like The Black Dahlia Murder and Sylosis have amazing rhythm sections. Sylosis is more your style from what i can tell, so check them out.
#9
I'm sure you can order it but I had to torrent it off the internet. Just get bit torrent and then get it from Pirate bay or something.
Originally Posted by happytimeharry
Your avatar is creepy, yet incredibly hypnotic...

I do what I can

Originally Posted by FiNNi
@AlterEdge: On a side note, I laughed when I noticed pedobear was your avatar

Me too... me too...
#11
although this may not apply completely considering he is also a lead guitarist, but check out dimebag. alot of him consider him iconic not for his solos only but for his groove oriented riffs, he was doing something with simple riffs (although not all his riffs were simple) that added a completely different element to pantera all because of his tight rhythm

i feel if you can add that "special" element (be it whatever) to your band through rhythm you really can be a rhythm guitarist that people will look up too.
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#12
You could take the maiden or Priest route, where both guitarist "duel" in a sense.
But yeah use interesting rhythms and chords to make your parts noteworthy. If theres a part in the lead you can harmonize with, do it. Also if you check out Megadeth, check out holy wars, such interesting rhythm parts.
#14
Ya i like screamo, just as long as every song doesnt have the same mindless open e string chugging, it gets so dull and boring, it has to have some variety. Ill go give those bands a good listen

Ill look for that dvd. ive never heard of Mark Tremonti before now but from that video he looks amazing
#15
Well then when I tell you he's the guitarist from Creed you may just shit yourself lol. But his newer band Alter Bridge really shows his talent.
Originally Posted by happytimeharry
Your avatar is creepy, yet incredibly hypnotic...

I do what I can

Originally Posted by FiNNi
@AlterEdge: On a side note, I laughed when I noticed pedobear was your avatar

Me too... me too...
Last edited by AlterEdge at Jan 5, 2012,
#16
What these people aren't telling you is to practice to a metronome, first of all. If you want to be a tight rhythm player, you need to develop a strong inner rhythm sense. If you want solid advice about developing rhythm, period, watch this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2HIY_IPIvCI&t=2m33s

Al Di Meola doesn't play metal, and the point isn't about any particular technique. The point is to be able to tap your foot, keep a constant rhythm, and play off it in creative ways. If you can get good at this, you'll be able to be a great rhythm guitar.
#18
Quote by JablesMB
The metronome thing brings up another point i forgot about earlier. Is playing along with the drums just as good? Can i practice just as good by playing along with the songs im learning as i can playing with just the metronome?


Metronome is preferable simply because no drummer is infallible. The drummer will always deviate from the tempo to some extent while a metronome will keep in time pretty much to the nanosecond. If you want to get really good at rhythm/tempo etc., play with a metronome, not a drummer.
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#19
Thats what i thought, but then what about professional recorded drums that you get on cds of big bands?
they never seem to have a single mistake throughout the whole song

And that Al Di Meola video was interesting, im gonna see if i can figure that out and apply it to metal
#20
The problem with practicing to your favourite songs if you're having difficulties is that by not taking the time to slow it down and perfect it, you're managing to play it but with tension and inefficiency. In most modern metal, those songs were most likely to have been recorded with a click in the first place.

edit: especially in tech/brutal death metal. The drums sometimes come after the guitars have been laid down to a click first. If not, the drummer is recording to a click and/or guitar scratch tracks. The drum tracks then get manipulated to make them 'more' on time.
Last edited by Iommianity at Jan 5, 2012,
#21
Check out this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Sw_trDFJw8 This is a really good way of working on your sense of rhythm and timing; if you can do this you should be good for just about anything.

You might also want to look at this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=asYfvMzjk7M It's not quite so rhythm oriented in terms of practice but it's a really good idea and can lead to some very interesting rhythms that will probably need some practice to work in your head.
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