#1
I'm terrible at making threads about bands.

So I'll just quote some stuff from various links.

Quote by All from Grace Notes: A Decade of Dischord and Harmony with Lungfish
Over the past few months, drummer Mitchell Feldstein, vocalist/lyricist Daniel Higgs, guitarist Asa Osborne, bassist Nathan Bell, and former bassist John Chriest have talked at length about Lungfish over large amounts of coffee at a variety of downtown cafés. During the talks, a number of ground rules were laid out. The band members consistently shied away from sharing any personal information about themselves. They declined to talk about side projects, including past bands. And they displayed a healthy distrust of all types of media, City Paper included. Despite those parameters, they shed a layer of dependable anonymity and, for the first time, allowed a peek behind the curtain.

...

The chords are heavy, and waves of electric fuzz ooze across the room. Each musician takes a simple element and works it to its fullest potential, and together, they thoroughly explore the limited territory that's been mapped out for each tune. The instructions on a package of Pura-Fit To Be Tried earplugs (sitting on a sofa arm) seem oddly appropriate at the moment.

...

Lungfish fans, here and across the country, seem to appreciate what they're hearing. "I love everything they do," says Dischord Records founder Ian MacKaye who doubles as Fugazi's singer/guitarist. A Washington, D.C.-based label that practically defined hardcore punk, Dischord has released all of Lungfish's records, despite the fact the band has never been perceived as hardcore, or punk for that matter.

"When I listen to music, I'm looking for something that seems as if the artists don't really have a choice in the matter," MacKaye says. "It's just what's coming out of them. It's not a put-on. Lungfish strikes me as a band that certainly has all those qualities. They're real and they're sincere about what they're doing."

"I was in college when I first heard Lungfish," says Dan Cohen, director of publicity for Astralworks, the New York-based label that's home to electronica acts such as the Chemical Brothers and Fatboy Slim. "They were everything I liked about the punk scene around D.C., in that they were more intelligent than most punk bands. The music was punk, but the songs were really interesting and had weird structures. Lungfish sounded so strange and yet so familiar."

....

Sipping coffee on a sunny day in Mount Vernon Square, Feldstein, Higgs, and Osborne listen to some of the compliments they've been paid and try to put them in perspective. In plain work pants and shirts, they could be longshoremen on break. There's a percussive stutter to Feldstein's voice, Higgs sounds like a sage carnival barker, and Osborne speaks haltingly, like a Southern gentleman. All three come across as solid citizens, the kind of people you'd want for neighbors.

"We all like a little bit of attention," Osborne says, "but as far as the music goes, we get a little self-conscious if people think it's too important or pay too much attention to us."
http://www2.citypaper.com/news/story.asp?id=3707
Quote by From I Love Lungfish, Seattle Music
As far as anyone's able to decipher from the band's mythology, Lungfish's music is the aural manifestation of a cosmic creature known simply as "The Lungfish," and the band members are vessels chosen to channel its communications through the universe. In his only interview of recent years (Punk Planet, Jan 2000), vocalist Daniel Higgs declared, "When I think of the music, I know it as an entity.... I would hope it speaks to people, because it's speaking to us as we're making it. It'll be telling us many things at once.... It takes all four of us to listen, to take orders from it...."

The longer you immerse yourself in Lungfish's music, the more the idea that a cosmic divinity compels them seems plausible. People often describe the band as "minimalist," "meditative," or, if being derogatory, "primitive" and "repetitive." It could be better said that Lungfish create a mesmerizing chaos of beauty, mythology, and graphic, unsettling imagery. It sounds like a collision between the MC5's focused rage, the majestic guitar pageantry of Led Zeppelin, the transcendent prayer-songs of Zen Buddhism, the psychedelic rants of the 13th Floor Elevators, Devo's sharp wit, H. P. Lovecraft's hypnotic terror-worlds, and the slow, easy sex found in the buoyant bass lines and rock-steady rhythms of Jamaican dub.

Live, Lungfish are unlike anything you'll soon witness again. A barrel-chested, heavily bearded, full-grown man deep in the throes of a shamanistic reverie, Higgs conducts himself more like a crazed prophet/poet from another dimension than a rock performer. Ferocious and otherworldly on stage, he's covered in tattoos from earlobes to ankles, and often labors in at least two pairs of pants, three or four shirts, a sweater, suit jacket, and work boots. Part Old Testament harbinger of the Apocalypse, and part physician's encyclopedia, he'll shed light on everything that's ever intrigued and terrified you. The band barely moves behind Higgs as his eyes roll back in his head and oceans of sweat froth from his beard, as he alternately shadowboxes or attempts to pull his own tongue out. I've observed him break a mic stand in half while screeching, "I beseech your long locust leg/Lust against a cloak of organs!... I beseech your secret number and name/the power of a single dollar/the power of the pinky finger!... wages of sin!... wages of sin!!!" And during a show at Brownies in NYC, two friends swear they saw him stab himself in the forehead with a safety pin and then eat a pen. Never a dull moment. Now you have the rare opportunity of seeing "The Lungfish" in action. Don't blow it.
Quote by From the band Self Defense Family
Necklace of Heads - “Nothing is Easy” is one of their less “Lungfish-y” tracks but is also one of their best. I’m not a sensitive person, but if you have this one on your headphones when already feeling disconnected from people you risk an emotional moment.

Talking Songs for Walking - I’m listening to these records as I type this and I’ve gotta say this thing is brilliant on all levels. Anything they borrowed from college rock or British alt, they reconfigured into something altogether their own. This is their most relatable record to a rock audience, I think. You could play this for most alt rock fans.

Rainbows from Atoms - A band finding its way. This record is much more what they’d become, but the songs aren’t there yet. The idea is strong. For years this was my least favorite song in their discography. Listening now, I think that was a cognitive failure on my part. “Animal Man” is a subtle stunner.

Pass and Stow - I don’t have my liner notes in front of me. I’m curious who played bass on this recording. It has a different quality to it. Oddly borrowing from the emo of the time, its moments of pure Lungfish moments are mitigated by some other influence.

Sound In Time - For years my favorite Lungfish album. So solid front to back, I used to listen to it on repeat for 24hr blocks. I would say this is the moment Lungfish became Lungfish to me. This album is a refinement of everything they did previously. You could shoot this into your arm.

Indivisible - Curveball here. Softer than Sound In Time, but not a step back to that earlier emo influenced sound. This is 100% its own thing. I recommend this to anyone looking to experience Lungfish. Drive a car at night to this or listen to it on your headphones on a late-night train. You’ll get it immediately. If I remember correctly the recording time on this thing was super short. Two or three days. Young bands take note. This album is easily 100x better than anything you’ll do and it took 1/8 the time.

Artificial Horizon - Contains two of the all-time best Lungfish songs. A solid album on its own merits, the fact that it has two “I could hear this song every day and never grow sick of it” songs pushes it into a new category. “Shed the World” feels like it was breezily written in 20min, and it’s still in the top three songs I’ve ever heard.

Unanimous Hour - This record is profoundly LUNGFISH and by this time no one could second-guess what they were doing. The one-two punch of the Ian MacKaye assisted “God’s Will” into “Mated” is just too much.

Necrophones - I think by this album they’d said “**** it” to getting new fans and were more interested in providing the people that already got it an unadulterated experience. Mission accomplished.

Love Is Love - There is no clear pop influence here. No clear any influence, really. But this record seems to crossover to more people than any other Lungfish record. I couldn’t say why, but it resonates strongly even with people who don’t love the rest of their catalog. I just want everyone to trip out on this for a second- this was the band’s 9th LP. Think about that shit. Producing some of your best material that deep into your career? **** BANDS THAT BREAK UP. THIS IS WHAT YOU BECOME IF YOU STAY TOGETHER AND DO IT RIGHT. YOU BECOME AN AWESOME BAND. Also, listen to “Fearfully and Wonderfully” and understand what I hope to achieve with Self Defense. Songs about god that are neither in praise nor derision. Critical thought through stream of consciousness! I want to roll around in this record! I love this ****ing shit.

Feral Hymns - Appropriate name. This record is aggressive. If they knew this would be their last record, they planned accordingly. This record is somber in a way that never seem maudlin. Harsh but never dumb. They give this album to old people before they push them out to sea on ice rafts.
Is this too long? Talk about Lungfish and how great they are.
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Quote by Bob_Sacamano
i kinda wish we all had a penis and vagina instead of buttholes

i mean no offense to buttholes and poop or anything

Rest in Peace, Troy Davis and Trayvon Martin and Jordan Davis and Eric Garner and Mike Brown
#2
No posts? Maybe if I included music.

Singpost
God's Will
Hallucinatorium
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Quote by Bob_Sacamano
i kinda wish we all had a penis and vagina instead of buttholes

i mean no offense to buttholes and poop or anything

Rest in Peace, Troy Davis and Trayvon Martin and Jordan Davis and Eric Garner and Mike Brown
#3
I liked God's Will the most
“Just to sum up: I would do various things very quickly.” - Donald Trump
#4
That's from Unanimous Hour, which is probably my favorite of theirs. Ian MacKaye produced a lot of their stuff, and I love his singing on "God's Will."
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Quote by Bob_Sacamano
i kinda wish we all had a penis and vagina instead of buttholes

i mean no offense to buttholes and poop or anything

Rest in Peace, Troy Davis and Trayvon Martin and Jordan Davis and Eric Garner and Mike Brown
#6
Pretty decent stuff, after going through band after band, in this forum, this is the first one I can really listen to. I just really don't like the math rock stuff.

What's a good place to start with these guys? Album wise?
"Pain or damage don't end the world nor despair, nor fuckin' beatings. The world ends when you're dead, until then you have more punishment in store. Stand it like a man, and give some back."
#7
Sound in Time
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Quote by Bob_Sacamano
i kinda wish we all had a penis and vagina instead of buttholes

i mean no offense to buttholes and poop or anything

Rest in Peace, Troy Davis and Trayvon Martin and Jordan Davis and Eric Garner and Mike Brown