#1
I've read about lots of people changing out the cap values on their tone pots for different pickups, with lower values allowing more treble into the signal.

Would removing them entirely do something similar, or would it only affect how the tone pots darken the sound of the instrument?
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#2
If you remove the tone knobs, you may as well remove the pots too. They will no longer function as tone knobs at all.
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#3
Removing the capacitor would effectively eliminate the tone control from the circuit, as it wouldn't be a tone control without the capacitor.
Acoustics:
1994 Seagull SM6
2007 Takamine G5013SVFT

Electrics:
2008 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain Top (Cherryburst)
1964 Gibson Melody Maker D (DC)

Amps:
Traynor YGL-1

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MXR Distortion III (C4 Modded)
#4
I see. Thanks for the clarification. So the caps are needed because they are where the pot bleeds the treble frequencies into, correct?
Maximum volume yields maximum goats.
#5
Well, more correctly, the Capacitor itself is kind of a filter. Just like any filter, it's meant to either allow certain things through (certain frequencies) or stop other frequencies from getting through (which it then bleeds to the ground on the back of the pot).
Acoustics:
1994 Seagull SM6
2007 Takamine G5013SVFT

Electrics:
2008 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain Top (Cherryburst)
1964 Gibson Melody Maker D (DC)

Amps:
Traynor YGL-1

Pedals
MXR Distortion III (C4 Modded)
#6
Quote by Quinlan
I see. Thanks for the clarification. So the caps are needed because they are where the pot bleeds the treble frequencies into, correct?

Right. Without them, I guess the pots would function as extra volume knobs.
Money beats soul every time.

Money beats soul...every time.

Money...beats soul...every...goddamn...time.
#7
When the pot is fully turned, the entire capacitor to ground is bypassed and it's like it was never there anyways.

You might as well take out all your pots in pursue of your pickups being more intimate with the preamp tubes.
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#8
I've wired bright switches into guitars before. Basically it's a bypass switch that knocks the tone control or in some cases all controls out of the signal chain. The one I wired worked normally when in one position and when the mini-toggle was flipped the signal went straight from the pickup selector to the output jack. The volume and tone were removed from the chain. Without the resistance and filtering they provide you get the brightest signal possible. I'd suggest putting a switch like this in so you can have the controls when you need them and the brightness when you want it.
Last edited by poppameth at Jan 6, 2012,
#9
Quote by DeathByDestroyr
When the pot is fully turned, the entire capacitor to ground is bypassed and it's like it was never there anyways.

You might as well take out all your pots in pursue of your pickups being more intimate with the preamp tubes.

this isnt entirely true, the path to ground through the capacitor is still there. as you increase the resistance, the cutoff frequency just goes higher. so with a higher resistance, then your cutoff frequency should be above the human hearing range. you will still have some slight roll off on just about every frequency though.

there are pots that do bypass the capacitor when turned all the way up. fender uses it on some of its guitars and basses. you can buy replacement parts too (example). ive got it on my tele, and it does seem to make a difference.


if you want to totally remove the switches, i suggest either the no-load pot (a la fender), a switch to bypass it entirely (poppameth's way), or just completely removing them from the guitar.
#10
if you want to brighten up your guitar use 1 meg pots for the tone and volume.
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#11
Quote by jof1029

if you want to totally remove the switches, i suggest either the no-load pot (a la fender), a switch to bypass it entirely (poppameth's way), or just completely removing them from the guitar.


Or, rather than paying stupid prices for Fender branded no-load tone pots, you could make your own using standard tone pots. See this tutorial http://www.projectguitar.com/tut/pots.htm
Acoustics:
1994 Seagull SM6
2007 Takamine G5013SVFT

Electrics:
2008 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain Top (Cherryburst)
1964 Gibson Melody Maker D (DC)

Amps:
Traynor YGL-1

Pedals
MXR Distortion III (C4 Modded)
#12
The other drawback to the Fender No-Load is that as far as I know they only make a short shafted one for mounting to a pick guard. I didn't have much luck finding one with a long enough shaft to mount in a wooden top. They may be more available now though.
#13
Quote by jof1029
this isnt entirely true, the path to ground through the capacitor is still there. as you increase the resistance, the cutoff frequency just goes higher. so with a higher resistance, then your cutoff frequency should be above the human hearing range. you will still have some slight roll off on just about every frequency though.


Um, not quite right. Turning the tone knob doesn't change the cutoff frequency. It changes how much is cut off, blending a cut signal and an uncut signal together. We tend to interpret the result as a frequency change because our ears and brain blend all the tones together and we think of the result as a single 'averaged' value. To change the cutoff frequency you have to change the capacitance. Look into a varitone switch.
#14
You can also try 50's wiring, basically what's happening there is, you get more out of the pickups with the volume on 10, and then the tone is more effective as you roll back on the volume.
Cusp of Magic
#15
Quote by RebuildIt
Um, not quite right. Turning the tone knob doesn't change the cutoff frequency. It changes how much is cut off, blending a cut signal and an uncut signal together. We tend to interpret the result as a frequency change because our ears and brain blend all the tones together and we think of the result as a single 'averaged' value. To change the cutoff frequency you have to change the capacitance. Look into a varitone switch.


The capacitor is not the only device that is important in determining the cut-off frequency of the circuit. The resistance of the tone pot at its setting is just as important. Your pickup system is essentially an RLC circuit, so the inductance of the pickups, their series resistance, the resistance of the tone pot setting and the tone capacitor all have to do with the frequency response of your guitar. Your volume control can also interact with the system.
#16
XGamer is correct, there is a complex interaction between all the components. My description is an over simplification, based on changing the capacitance having the most noticeable effect.

Back to the original question, Yes, excluding the capacitor will give the least amount of treble filtering. There is not much difference between having no capacitor at all, compared to a capacitor that is disabled by a normally functioning tone pot. You would probably notice more difference by using different patch cords. I'm not that discerning that I can hear a difference from one cord to the next.
Last edited by RebuildIt at Jan 8, 2012,