#1
1) Ive started learning scales and want to know how to insert them into particular chord progressions. Does anyone know of any good books which will teach me scale patterns all over the fret board, and what chords/keys work with them?

2) If I play a barred Amaj on the 5th fret, Then play a barred Gmaj on the third fret, then play a barred Cmaj .....then back to an A mag....I notice it sounds decent! Why is this?

Seeing how the "home tone" is an A maj chord and the schematic for the key of A maj is

I ii iii IV V vi vii*

isnt the Gmaj chord im playing supposed to be diminished in the key of A maj? and the C chord minor? Whats happening thats enabling the chord progression to sound decent when it doesnt even fall correctly into the chords for A maj?
#2
Sounds like you're a little too stuck in music theory, my friend...take a bit of a walk on the wild side
#3
Quote by Basti95
Sounds like you're a little too stuck in music theory, my friend...take a bit of a walk on the wild side
Agree. But the answer to question one is free program called "Fretpro".
#4
Quote by Basti95
Sounds like you're a little too stuck in music theory, my friend...take a bit of a walk on the wild side


Wow, that is an excellent idea, A-ok!
#5
Quote by Basti95
Sounds like you're a little too stuck in music theory, my friend...take a bit of a walk on the wild side


or not stuck enough into music theory

Quote by Go0ber
1) Ive started learning scales and want to know how to insert them into particular chord progressions. Does anyone know of any good books which will teach me scale patterns all over the fret board, and what chords/keys work with them?

no. patterns won't help you. learn the notes in the scale, learn the notes on the fretboard, learn how to build chords. patterns are a band-aid fix and will ultimately stunt your growth as a player and musician in general.


2) If I play a barred Amaj on the 5th fret, Then play a barred Gmaj on the third fret, then play a barred Cmaj .....then back to an A mag....I notice it sounds decent! Why is this?

Seeing how the "home tone" is an A maj chord and the schematic for the key of A maj is

I ii iii IV V vi vii*

isnt the Gmaj chord im playing supposed to be diminished in the key of A maj? and the C chord minor? Whats happening thats enabling the chord progression to sound decent when it doesnt even fall correctly into the chords for A maj?


it would be G# major, for the record, if it was diatonic to A major. since A->G is a minor 7th interval, it's a pretty clear indicator that you're borrowing from the parallel minor (or you're in the parallel minor borrowing from the parallel major, but based on resolution I'm assuming that's not the case). A minor has neither sharps nor flats, so those 2 chords are borrowed easily. it is a little off though considering you're borrowing half the chords in the progression, but it's all down to your ears.
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Last edited by Hail at Jan 6, 2012,
#6
As far as your second question is concerned:

First, I disagree that it sounds decent. It sounds bad, and out of key (mainly due to the C major). However, one way (and perhaps not the best way) to explain why the A major and the G major go together because they both are in the key of Bminor, which would be the best chord to resolve the progression on.

The first chord/note played is not necessarily the tonic.
Last edited by Riffman15 at Jan 6, 2012,
#7
Quote by Go0ber
1) Ive started learning scales and want to know how to insert them into particular chord progressions. Does anyone know of any good books which will teach me scale patterns all over the fret board, and what chords/keys work with them?

If progression is in Am, then you are use the Am scale, because that's what the harmony dictates. You can use out of key notes as well, but you will always want to come back to A, the tonic.

You can learn scales all over the fretboard, but don't use them as a crutch. Be sure to learn the intervals and how to spell the scale and eventually you won't have to rely on fretboard patterns. Also, learn the notes on the fretboard.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


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