#1
I want to write a song, but I want to go about it intelligently.
First, if i'm in the key of E major, I would use the power chords: E5, F#5, G# 5, B5, C#5, D#5, and F5 correct? Even though the minor chords are F# G # and C, because power chords are just the root and the 5th and the 5th doesnt get flatted correct?
Also, If I were in this key what scales could I use because, for example, the E blues scale notes dont line up with the key signature? Does it even matter as long as the scale has the same letter as the key?
Next, is a definite underlying proggression neccesary if your just playing a riff.
So for example do i need a chord progression for a verse if i have a riff?
Or should I just create a progression and have a riff that just highlights the notes in that progression without actually playing the chords, or since its all in key say f*** it?
Finally, what are some scales to be used in rock, alt rock, hard rock, metal, classic rock, basically anything other than latin flamenco sounding scales.
I decided what the heck why not try writing some songs, I wrote one, but I'd like to have a clearer picture for this one, as far as understanding whats going on.
I'm going for anything with distortion genre for this song.
Finally, thanks for (hopefully) reading this longwinded post and answering my question.
#3
1) F5 is fine, there is no such thing as 'correct' and 'incorrect' in music theory, however, there is no F in the key of E major, you're getting into modal territory there but don't worry about it
2) The Blues Scale doesn't fit into any key signature because of the b5, again, it doesn't really matter
3) You don't need a chord progression for a riff
4) Major/minor pentatonic, natural major/minor, harmonic minor and the various modes can all be used in those types of music, you might find others.
With all due respect, I think you're looking at theory in the wrong way. It is NOT a set of rules you have to follow to write 'correct' music. What it is is a number of patterns and guidelines that work to produce music that sounds good
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#4
I wouldn't get too hung up on theory like that but a few other scales to consider:
Melodic Minor (Sounds more 'happy' like a major scale)
Harmonic Minor (Dark/Arabian sound depending on how you use it)
Augmented Fifth (Similar to Major scale but with the addition of the harmonic minor)
Pentatonic Scales (A bit boring imho, but whatever floats your boat)
Be-Bop (Another jazzy 8 tone scale)

There's also lots of regional scales (Algerian, Egyptian etc...)

I tend to write in Minor/Harmonic Minor/Augmented Fifth most of the time, for a melancholic/dark sound but styles vary so take your pick... or... disregard scales until you've written something?
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#5
1) My bad I typed the wrong chord in there
Ok thank you, I know the rules can be broken, artists do it all the time, I just want to fully grasp theory and had some questions. Thanks again
#6
Quote by FenderGuy909
1) My bad I typed the wrong chord in there
Ok thank you, I know the rules can be broken, artists do it all the time, I just want to fully grasp theory and had some questions. Thanks again

Theory is not rules!
My Soundcloud
Always up for some C4C, been compared to Frank Turner, The Cure's Robert Smith and Bruce Springsteen so check out my stuff if you like the sound of that