#1
Hey all, it's been a while since I've posted here.

One thing I've noticed, as I've been playing more and improving my ability to solo over chord progressions...in many (most?) solos, chord tones are often sustained for a longer duration than non-chord tones in the solo. For example, in an Am F C G progression, the notes of the Am chord (A, C, E) are often the notes that the soloist "lands on" when playing over the Am chord, while the passing tones are literally that-passing tones!

What is the musical/theoretical explanation for this?
#2
It's called "emphasising chord tones"

It helps give progression to a solo. You'll find that the melody/vocal line also emphasises the chord tones.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#3
Quote by AlanHB
It's called "emphasising chord tones"

It helps give progression to a solo. You'll find that the melody/vocal line also emphasises the chord tones.


LOL, thanks! Figured that it was a pretty simple explanation, just wanted to be sure....
#4
Also, a passing tone might be dissonant. While it may sound good in passing, pardon the pun, it doesn't sound good to sit there and emphasize it.