#1
Hey guys,

I want to record a simple song with one singing voice and one rhythm acoustic guitar.
I'm the guitarist and a friend sings..
how can we setup the mic (I only have one condenser) to record both the guitar and the voice at the same time so it's a nice balanced sound?
or do we have to record the guitar and the vocals seperatly?
#2
Record separately, you'll have more options(levels,panning etc) and it's the "proper" way of recording
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#4
Is it a large diaphragm condenser? If so you might be able to sort something out.
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#5
A pro engineer might well NOT record just the guitar and add the vocals later for that kind of a recording. There are a few things I would try first, personally, now that I have a little more experience and a better room.

If you have a decent room, have her sit in a chair and you stand while playing. That will put both the guitar and the vocal pretty close to the same angle towards the mic. As long as the levels between you are okay, you should get an okay recording with just the one mic. Record a bit and play it back... play the guitar quieter, or move backwards in the room if you are too loud, and vice-versa if you are too quiet.

If you don't have a decent room, though, it will sound boxy. In that case, the closer the miking the less of the room sound you will get. In that case, you might have no other option than to record the guitar first and then overdub the vocal.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#6
I'd say record each seperately. If you record them together with one mic, you won't be able to mix each seperately.
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#7
In his case, that might be his best bet.

In an ideal setup, he would have a good room and a pair of figure-8 mics. One mic on the guitar and the other on the vocal, with the guitar in the vocal mic null and the vocal in the guitar mic null.

That way you capture a truly live performance with the "vibe" (both sonically and performance-wise) of a live performance in a room, AND be able to have a fair bit of control over both parts.

If it was me, I would actually try a pair of small cardiod condensors pointing at the guitar, and another mic on the singer in an effort to capture that sonic and performance vibe I mentioned above. Not having any figure-8 mics, I'd have to be careful about placement to avoid phasing and managing bleeding as much as I can. That would allow me to get a nice stereo mix on the guitar, yet keeping it to the sides so as not to compete too much with the vocal, which would get panned center.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
Similar to above, here is one thing I did recently... and you could do this with one mic, though I used two. I didn't do the above approach in this case as my room acoustics weren't totally nailed down yet, and my cardiod small-diaphragm condensors were still on order)

Track the singer and guitarist together in the room to get the live performance vibe.

Overdub the singer using headphones with a well-chosen/well-placed mic, with the singer listening back to the original performance through headphones. (I used an SM7b for the vocal in this case)

Overdub the guitar using another mic (or even the same mic) on a single mono channel. Copy and paste that new guitar part and pan each slightly right and left. (I used a Rode NT1 in this case)

Get rid of the original live recording underneath, leaving you with three tracks:
1+2 - acoustic guitar panned R/L
3 - lead vocal

All tracks are pretty cleanly isolated, but the performance vibe of the live performance is maintained.

The end result of this is here (my 12 year old daughter is the singer here...) - www.greenroomrecording.ca/Fireflies.mp3

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.