#1
I've got an audition with Tech Music School (London) at the start of February and it would mean so much to me if I got in. I believe I can, but I want to give myself the best chance possible.

Here's the criteria:

Performance. You've got to play a song. Cissy Strut - The Meters, Valerie - The Zutons, Highway to Hell - AC/DC, Use Somebody - Kings of Leon, I Feel Good - James Brown.

I've chosen Highway to Hell as it's a great song, it's easy as hell (as are the others) and I already know it, except for the solo. But I'll have that down in no time.

Styles. You've got to come up with a rhythm part for a rock, blues, reggae and funk backing track. That's pretty easy. I've just gotta practice them a bit.

Techniques. You just gotta discuss your knowledge of scales and arpeggios. No prior knowledge is needed, but I'm okay with my scales.

Sight Reading. No previous experience is necessary. But I can sort of read music. My rhythm reading is shit hot, but reading the notes isn't. I can identify the notes pretty quick, but it's just reading it and playing I gotta work on. But I think I'm easily at the standard which I could get in.

Now, as I said, I think I should be able to get in, but I don't wanna get complacent so I want to revise everything I already know and get better. I have one month. I'm not too worried about my playing, I think that's at a decent enough standard anyway.

Has anyone got any sites that can help with my theory knowledge and sight reading? Or generally useful sites?
#2
just go grab a pile of sheet music and go crazy.

and remember, you're not just trying to get in - you're trying to really wow them without necessarily being too show-y. it's obvious here that they're prioritizing rhythm work, so you need a really solid rhythm. don't underestimate "easy" things and say "oh i just need to work on it"

tl;dr work on what you're not brilliant at till you're brilliant. then some more.
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#3
My rhythm is pretty solid. I've always been into rhythm guitar more than lead anyway. But thanks for the advice.
#4
In styles, for reggae, work out your progression, then play triads on the top three strings only. With a very... very light touch, and bouncing action with the fingers. So light in fact, that if you weren't plugged in, the notes would barely be audible.

That will be stylistically authentic, and whomever is auditioning you will be impressed with that. Even though it's not technically demanding, that's not the point. The point is to demonstrate knowledge of styles.

I only mention reggae cuz it's probably a little more neglected than other styles, in general.

Incidentally, you WILL get in. It doesn't have to be perfect ya know. If they made it that hard to get in, how the hell is the college gonna make any money? You'll get in, mate.
#5
For the funk part you could do an E9 shape in some groove and then right when you start over you make a groovy slide from D#9 to E9 :p
#6
Add the pinky on and off for a 13th. Classic funk.
#7
The Reggae part could be considered technical..why not?

A lot of players who try to play softly also indirectly sway their rhythm negatively.

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#8
Yes, agreed. I actually wanted to mention that, that playing lightly and subtly, whilst keeping good time is in fact quite technical.

Some ppl just don't appreciate that, which is why I didn't mention it the first time. Ironically, probably should've.
#9
Quote by mdc
Yes, agreed. I actually wanted to mention that, that playing lightly and subtly, whilst keeping good time is in fact quite technical.

Some ppl just don't appreciate that, which is why I didn't mention it the first time. Ironically, probably should've.



Yes;

I notice in a lot of my students especially when I ask them to go decrescendo in for example a broken chord that they lose time.

There's a video of Paul Gilbert on youtube which provides a nice lesson for doing this correctly.

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#10
The biggest piece of advice is to play confidently. I know my professor much prefers a student that isn't great yet but possesses confidence and the motivation and drive to improve over someone who is good but timid with their playing. Even a "wrong note" note can sound "right" if played with authority.
Ben
#11
Awesome thanks guys! I've pretty much got the funk style down really well. All the styles follow a 12 bar blues progression so that makes life easier. The funk, rock and possibly blues I should sail through. I'll try out the reggae one now. Thanks a lot!
#12
I'm not just being a troll or an elitist, but...

Do you really think there is any worth in going to school to be a rock musician? Classical/Jazz music tends to require a high level of proper training to really perform the music, while with rock (which is a great genre of music, don't get me wrong) the important thing seems to be just playing with people as often as you can and trying to write your own tunes.
I couldn't think of a thing that I hope tomorrow brings
#13
The education and experience is definitely worth it. I did ICMP for a year in London, and it was great. It's helped me with university applications to pursue harder areas of music such as jazz etc... I wouldn't necessarily recommend doing their degree program because it really doesn't guarantee you a job at all at the end (then again, what does these days?) but the one year diploma was a great prep that improved me so fast and put me on the right track for the next few years. I ended up taking 2 years off and was successfully teaching and gigging.... now I'm doing applications and I'm way more confident than I ever would've been before..... but that's just me
#14
Do you really think there is any worth in going to school to be a rock musician? Classical/Jazz music tends to require a high level of proper training to really perform the music, while with rock (which is a great genre of music, don't get me wrong) the important thing seems to be just playing with people as often as you can and trying to write your own tunes.

you realize thats exactly what people said about jazz before it became academically acceptable?
TS, that audition seems insanely easy. if you have all that stuff together now, you may want to consider applying to some more demanding schools, as you may find somewhere thats a better fit for you, or that gives you a better financial aid award, or that you like more (or you may find that the school your applying to now is perfect). It's important to remember that while a school's dificulty to get in says nothing about the quality of the education you can get there, it may well be to your benefit to consider every option before going somewhere that will accept someone who can't read, and doesn't know scales and arpeggios, but can play an ACDC song, if only because that may end up being the average level of your peers there, which will probably not end up pushing you to excel.
but, if you like the school and think you can reach your goals there, then go for it.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
Last edited by tehREALcaptain at Jan 9, 2012,
#15
If those are the requirements for audition, then the first thing that I thought of, is they appear to be cream-puff requirements, and going through the motions under the pretense of "qualifying". I'm not saying that is the case here, but nothing here looks like it measures the drive and commitment and mettle of whether or not the student can handle the demands and pace of a serious study program.

Also, it doesn't indicate how "competitive" it is for those slots, as it seems that easily thousands could accomplish that, so I'd want to know what their entrance rate was, as in how many audition, and how many were accepted. if 100 audition and 10 get in, then you know you have to be at the top of the class, and that would seem to convey that it's more significant a program, to my eyes, and not just there to collect your money and toss you in. It's about commitment to your development, from their teaching standpoint that makes for stringent entrance requirements.

It's harder for guitarists to make the High School Jazz band locally here, than it is to meet the audition requirements based on your description.

That said, we've done a lot of prep with people trying to get into music schools here and online, and had success, but with 1 month notice? No, unless you were hitting it red hot and seriously breaking a sweat with everything I gave you with absolutely no excuses, I'm not sure that even I could do that with you. On average, we've had 3-5 months lead times with students that came to us "cold". With a month to work with you, I'd probably put you on a sight reading regimen, and expect you to be shoring up the rest of these requirements.

Our admission record: 9 for 9 got in. I'm very happy about that.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jan 9, 2012,
#16
Quote by WholeLottaIzzy
I've got an audition with Tech Music School (London) at the start of February and it would mean so much to me if I got in.

Wheaty boy is head of guitar there, I believe. Absolute monster.