#1
alright so i just spend the last 2 days perfecting my major scale on guitar and was all ecstatic, that was until i found out that there's 5 different shapes and they should all be learned

so my question is why do i need to learn all 5 shapes? and do i have to learn them before i move on to the pentatonic or minor?

thanks!
#5
is that the only reason of learning scales? also, when i learn the different scales, should i move from like A major to a C major and so on.. and each time i play a note, should i think the name of that note in my head to memorize?
#6
Quote by doode94
alright so i just spend the last 2 days perfecting my major scale on guitar and was all ecstatic, that was until i found out that there's 5 different shapes and they should all be learned

so my question is why do i need to learn all 5 shapes? and do i have to learn them before i move on to the pentatonic or minor?

thanks!


Because no guitarist wants to be a one trick pony.

If you only ever know one shape, over time your solo's will become repetitive.
#7
Essentially, yes.

I don't really understand what you mean by swapping from A major to C major, you can't just suddenly swap the key like that unless the key swap fits in with the song.

As for me, I just learned all the notes gradually as I played for about a year. Learning notes would definitely be faster if you do that, but it's impossible to go atleast a year of playing without knowing a very decent amount of the notes.

EDIT: Oh and what he^ said. Using different shapes means that you use the same notes but in different ways and positions, making your solos far more interesting.
West Ham United
Last edited by King Donkey at Jan 7, 2012,
#8
Quote by King Donkey
Essentially, yes.

I don't really understand what you mean by swapping from A major to C major, you can't just suddenly swap the key like that unless the key swap fits in with the song.

As for me, I just learned all the notes gradually as I played for about a year. Learning notes would definitely be faster if you do that, but it's impossible to go atleast a year of playing without knowing a very decent amount of the notes.

EDIT: Oh and what he^ said. Using different shapes means that you use the same notes but in different ways and positions, making your solos far more interesting.


what i meant by going from practicing major scale on a A root note to a C, not switching while u play or anything
#9
If I'm understanding you correctly, then no, that doesn't work. If by the major scale (also known as the Ionion shape), you mean the 8-10-12 pattern from the E string, then you can't just suddenly swap to playing the 'Ionion shape' as 5-7-9 still on the E string. That means you would have changed key from C major to A major, which would sound odd if done during a solo (unless of course the song was supposed to change key).

Instead of playing the Ionion shape from the A root, you would instead play the minor shape (also known as the Aeolian shape) from the 5th fret, which goes 5-7-8.

Sorry if that sounded like mad rambling.
West Ham United
Last edited by King Donkey at Jan 7, 2012,
#10
Quote by doode94
but why should i learn the different shapes? i'm puzzled here


Ask yourself that.

"Why should I learn all 5 shapes."?

I asked myself that and came to the conclusion that it would make me a much better guitarist. So far I have learned 3... Major, Minor, and (insert key here) Major. My guitar playing has improved quite a bit sense I stopped trying to ignore Music theory.
#11
Quote by doode94
but why should i learn the different shapes? i'm puzzled here


because you don't want to be playing on the same "box"-type shape all the time. if you always play the same pattern, your playing will always sound the same because you'll only be using a tiny portion of the neck at any given point. learning more shapes will allow you to play horizontally along the board, rather than simply vertically within a 5 fret area. I am aware that you don't technically have more notes, as a major scale only has 7 notes any way you cut it, but you open up greater possibilities.