#1
Basically what the title says. I've never bought actual music books before (grade handbooks being the exception) so I don't really know what to look for in them. I have a pretty decent understanding of theory already and I can read notation.

Any help is appreciated.
Last edited by anonimau5 at Jan 7, 2012,
#2
I really like Forward Motion by Hal Galper - you'll need basic notation and theory skills already though.

The Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine is a classic, although I don't think it's great in every area, it is huge.
#3
Quote by Freepower
I really like Forward Motion by Hal Galper - you'll need basic notation and theory skills already though.

The Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine is a classic, although I don't think it's great in every area, it is huge.


Thank you sir, I was already thinking of the Jazz Theory Book and it sounds pretty good - bit pricey mind :O

Yeah, I have a pretty decent understanding of theory already and I can read notation. Probably should put that in my first post..
#5
Quote by theknuckster
Jazzology is an outstanding book for jazz theory and everything jazzy in general, definitely.


Thanks. I've just read a few reviews and it seems like this would be a wise purchase. Looks like I'm going to probably buy Jazzology and The Jazz Theory Book. Do either of the books provide jazz standards for me to play through or..?
#6
Quote by anonimau5
Thanks. I've just read a few reviews and it seems like this would be a wise purchase. Looks like I'm going to probably buy Jazzology and The Jazz Theory Book. Do either of the books provide jazz standards for me to play through or..?


The Jazz theory book takes a few bars of jazz and blues standards and non standards throughout the book and explaining the theory behind these excerpts.

ie melodic, harmonic, chord subs, note choices etc.

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