#1
why do you see less barre chords and more power chords? they both have thick full tones, especially in the rock and more specifically punk spectrum of music.
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#2
Can't say I've ever noticed one outweighing the other.


People prefer certain things I guess. Plus power chords don't contain a 3rd so you can mess around with that on the melody.
#3
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2KqNMYgtiCY

power chords are just easy for lazy players, though in the grand scheme of things dyads have their place, provided they're not abused to shit
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#4
I find with heavy distortion barre chords can sound a bit much.

Power chords are nothing to do with being lazy, its just that a lot of the time simple is best. Power chords with a good distortion tone just cut through very well. They are great for riffs.
#5
Quote by jkielq91
I find with heavy distortion barre chords can sound a bit much.

Power chords are nothing to do with being lazy, its just that a lot of the time simple is best. Power chords with a good distortion tone just cut through very well. They are great for riffs.

Very true. All the different intervals in a full chord can sound messy with a lot of distortion.
REGGIE
#6
Quote by jkielq91
I find with heavy distortion barre chords can sound a bit much.

Power chords are nothing to do with being lazy, its just that a lot of the time simple is best. Power chords with a good distortion tone just cut through very well. They are great for riffs.


get better pickups, turn down your gain, learn to use dynamics in your playing. you'd be surprised how easy it is to ring out a 7 string extended chord with high distortion.
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#7
Quote by jkielq91
I find with heavy distortion barre chords can sound a bit much.

Power chords are nothing to do with being lazy, its just that a lot of the time simple is best. Power chords with a good distortion tone just cut through very well. They are great for riffs.
Permit me to attempt to explain why this is. There are 2 major types of distortion in amplification, harmonic, (which is perceived as pleasant), and inter modulation, (which can be perceived as dissonant).

From the standpoint of practical result, if you play the1st and 5th together the inter modulation will provide a harmonic of the 3rd.

If you play the 1st, 3rd, and 5th together, the inter modulation chordal product will be closer to the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th played together. Ouch, my ears!
#8
Try playing minor and major thirds down around 40-50hz with distortion.

Even then, power chords can break up a little, but I'm sure you can then appreciate why people prefer the simpler harmony. Not everything has to be dense and complex and occupy the entire spectrum. Thirds aren't 'professional' intervals where you become a good player by using them.
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#9
Quote by Dayn
Try playing minor and major thirds down around 40-50hz with distortion.

Even then, power chords can break up a little, but I'm sure you can then appreciate why people prefer the simpler harmony. Not everything has to be dense and complex and occupy the entire spectrum. Thirds aren't 'professional' intervals where you become a good player by using them.


i never said power chords are inherently bad, but relying on them as much as some bands do rather than playing individual notes, or more complex chords, is what i consider lazy a lot of the time.

and i did say extended chords, not just triads. big, spacey chords sound awesome with a lot of metal, p modern stuff.

it's just become a bit of a cliche to use x5s for every little thing in rock/metal. even just throwing in octaves or a simple arpeggio to break up the monotony is nice

and unless you're drop-tuned on an 8-string, a guitar isn't gonna hit 40-50hz range.
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#10
Because the isnt a 3rd in the chord it sounds neither major or minor and can be used anywhere to fatten up a sound or cut through a mix. or simple chord substitutions if none others seem to work. (they have proven very helpful when substituting weird chords while site reading)
#11
Quote by Frusciantay
Because the isnt a 3rd in the chord it sounds neither major or minor and can be used anywhere to fatten up a sound or cut through a mix. or simple chord substitutions if none others seem to work. (they have proven very helpful when substituting weird chords while site reading)
Are you sure you don't mean "sight reading"......
#13
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
I think the most important question here is, who exactly is hyping power chords?
Oddly, an overarching question might be, "is a power chord actually a chord at all"?
#14
Barr chords work best with little gain, when you start using so much gain, you have to use power chords to cut down on the muddiness and gain some clarity in the chord. I don't see many high gain players using barr chords and actually sounding any good.
#15
Quote by Captaincranky
Oddly, an overarching question might be, "is a power chord actually a chord at all"?


Lets not start that discussion again lol
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#16
Quote by ethan_hanus
Barr chords work best with little gain, when you start using so much gain, you have to use power chords to cut down on the muddiness and gain some clarity in the chord. I don't see many high gain players using barr chords and actually sounding any good.


say what you will about the actual genre, but djent's high production value and tone whoring makes it very realistic to use unconventional chords despite being classified predominantly as metal.

they might not be sitting and strumming, but look at the chord usage of groups like AAL and scale the summit

Quote by Captaincranky
Oddly, an overarching question might be, "is a power chord actually a chord at all"?


i legitimately hate you
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#17
Quote by Hail
i legitimately hate you
Oh, dear! I suppose that's insignificant news, of one sort or another.

BTW, did you know that self loathing can cause a person to lash out like that?

Well, now that I've at least accomplished something for the day, I'm off to ponder why the Moody Blues didn't name their album, "In Search of the Lost Third".
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 8, 2012,
#18
I rather like power chords >.>

Really, I just enjoy playing around with dyads on guitar. Using major/minor 3rds, 6ths, things like that are kinda fun to mess around with. I think branching out and mixing powerchords with other dyads adds a lot more color to a song than just all powerchords everywhere.
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#19
Using bar chords is often bad orchestration.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#20
They're easy to play, for one thing. Then, fifths are virtually pure while thirds aren't. Distortion makes it worse, leaving full triads a sour mush.
#21
Quote by Cloudkicker
why do you see less barre chords and more power chords? they both have thick full tones, especially in the rock and more specifically punk spectrum of music.


They have cancer curative properties... so who wouldn't use them. That's all the hype! Power Chords Cure for Cancer.

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